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Thread: OT: Buying Firearms (Long Arms) in the US & Export

  1. #11
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    High, Wide and Handsome, Montana
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    Finding one unmolested may be a challenge. Try Mitchells Mausers. Sold my dad's m1 Garand years ago.

  2. #12
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    Aug 2018
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    Loveland,CO
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    Try gunsinternational.com

  3. #13
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    Apr 2014
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    Ventura,CA.
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    Hi there Mihit, this website should give you some relevant info. Falling afoul of firearms regulations is not to be taken lightly as you probably well know. Hope this helps. Jim

    https://www.pmddtc.state.gov/?id=ddt...f9ff621f961987

  4. #14
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    North Carolina
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    Well, before you get too far into this, check on the previously mentioned https://www.gunbroker.com/

    See if your interest level is high enough as run-of-the-mill Garands are now going in the $1000 to $1500 range. If you want a "period correct" one with lock-bar windage sight, correctly dated barrel and parts, original stock with correct ordnance stamp marks; figure a ball park of double that.

    Steve
    Last edited by SteveF; 02-10-2019 at 12:04 PM.

  5. #15
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    Jul 2012
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    East Central Louisiana, USA
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    Most M1's (but not all) on the market have been arsenal rebuilt at least once. Finding an original WW2 M1 that has not been upgraded at an arsenal will be difficult and expensive.

    If a weapon makes it all the way back to an arsenal for repair, it will generally be torn down and the parts will not be kept together. Basically, all the parts go into a bin with many others. Those are inspected, refinished and put on the shelf for use. An armorer will then build a weapon from the parts bins. Any changes or upgrades will be done during the new build. It doesn't matter when a part was used or when it was built. If it meets whatever the current specs are for that part, it will be used. This is what makes finding an "original" US military weapon so difficult.

    On top of that, millions of US weapons were sent out to other countries under the lend lease program and there is no way to know what changes or mods were done while it was out of the country. A bunch of these guns were returned in the 80's and 90's. In many cases, the laws at that time wouldn't allow the receivers to be returned, so the guns were broken down and sold as parts kits. Then the law changed and the receivers were brought back in. Those parts kits were then reassembled back into guns, but originality was lost.

    Then the laws changed again and the complete guns were imported, but the importer had to stamp their name on the barrel. You will often find these with "Blue Sky" stampings. In addition, there was such a demand over the years for M1's that many were built on new receivers with surplus parts. And then there are the "rewelds". These are receivers that were built from 2 usually torch cut de-milled parts that were bought as scrap. Some are done very well and some are pretty terrible.

    FWIW-I shot a well done reweld M1 in DCM competition for a couple of years because it was all I could afford. When the original receivers started coming back in, I bought one and had my old rifle rebuilt to National Match standards with a new barrel. It had no value except as a shooter. That was the rifle I shot at Camp Perry.

    Bottom line is, be very careful what you pay for. If you want WW2 originality, be sure to have an expert look the gun over very carefully and get a guarantee in writing that certifies it is what you think you are buying.
    Last edited by Bluechips; 02-10-2019 at 12:21 PM.

  6. #16
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    san jose, ca. usa
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    If you really want an m1 garand, try to buy one with matching DCM sales/paperwork. It at least won't be a reweld. and, if you move here and become a citizen, you can buy an m1 from the army through the dcm.

  7. #17
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    Apr 2014
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    Ventura,CA.
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  8. #18
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    Jul 2012
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    East Central Louisiana, USA
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    The old DCM is now the CMP (Civilian Marksmanship Program). Even they are selling "parts" rifles in some cases. Their top of the line rifle has new CMP stock and barrel. I do think that they still have original rifles, though, but original in the case that they met the military specs for whatever time period they were put into storage.

    Many of the completely original rifles they have are Korean war rifles. I believe these are H and R and International Harvester.

    Many of the old DCM rifles were indeed brand new pieces. If you can score one of these, you'll be doing well.

  9. #19
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    North Carolina
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluechips View Post
    .......................

    Bottom line is, be very careful what you pay for. If you want WW2 originality, be sure to have an expert look the gun over very carefully and get a guarantee in writing that certifies it is what you think you are buying.
    I would seriously doubt that you will get a written guarantee from any "expert". Years ago I had a phone conversation with Scott Duff about him providing this exact service and he said he wouldn't do it because there is, in most cases, no real way to tell for sure. For example, I can tell you if a barrel has had the date stamp ground off and the WW2 Winchester stamp marks applied because everyone except Winchester put a relief cut on the barrel. So, if the barrel has WW2 Winchester stamp mark AND a relief cut, it is 100% fake. On the other hand the only thing that separates a Springfield clip latch from the Winchester one is the Winchester one has a small inspector punch mark. Any idiot, OK most idiots can put a punch mark correctly on the Springfield clip latch and claim it is a Winchester and no "expert" can tell them apart. That's not even counting the guys years ago in South Carolina who were making repro Garand barrels and went out of business. Apparently just before shutting down they decided to make some WW2 Winchester barrels and sell them as such. So, in that case, if you find a WW2 Winchester barrel with perfect stamping AND no relief cut AND a perfect throat and muzzle and finish, that is also 100% fake.

    Years ago some jackass in Georgia was making and selling ordnance stamping tools, so people could make their rifle look correct. Guess how long it took for fake WW2 stocks to start showing up on eBay? Personally I'd bet 75% of the WW2 stock for sale right now are fake.

    Regarding the CMP, sure. All he has to do is move here, join a CMP affliated club, attend a CMP marksmanship training course and then send in all his paperwork. Not sure if he also would have to become a US citizen but wouldn't be surprised.

    Steve
    Last edited by SteveF; 02-10-2019 at 01:07 PM.

  10. #20
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    Don't forget to check ITAR (International Traffic In Arms) regulations, too.

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