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Thread: Realigning a rebuild bandsaws' wheels?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
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    Buffalo NY USA
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    212

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    I used to align bike rims by using a chunk of bent wire as an indicator pointer, sharpened on one end and fasten the other end to the frame somehow. Duct tape even. Spin it and align your rim till it has the same gap between the rim and the wire all around. Keep reading, it gets better --

    You could do the same with an indicator and a mag base: stick the mag base somewhere on the frame, setup and pre-load your indicator on the rim. Adjust till it stops moving the needle. Undo the magnet and move it to the other rim. Repeat till you got the same numbers as the first rim. Done.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    On the Oil Coast,USA
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    19,276

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    Dumb question,have you tried just putting a blade on it and making a cut?
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by wierdscience View Post
    Dumb question,have you tried just putting a blade on it and making a cut?
    -At the very least, I still need to rebuild the gearbox and wire the VFD.

    But really, half the reason I decided to "rebuild" this thing is because it didn't cut well. I mentioned in a thread here several years ago, that with this saw, depending on how thick the material was, the blade would almost always jam at some point during the cut, and if you weren't right there to catch it, the blade would pop off the wheels.

    The guide rollers were improperly aligned- and couldn't be properly aligned in part because the adjuster screw on one of them had broken off at the boss- one of the guide arms had been broken and badly rewelded, and overall, the machine had been beat to hell in some industrial shop- or series of industrial shops.

    If I'm going to spend all this time and effort rebuilding the thing, I don't want to just throw it together and hope for the best. I want to know it's properly aligned, both for maximum blade life (and wheel life) and for the best possible cut.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Temple, Tx
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    Can you do the job by removing the saw from the base, jigging it up so you can use a level (with 123 blocks)?

  5. #15

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    Clamping a long extrusion across a wheel would let you sweep it back and forth across the other one to detect mistakes alignment. If your wheels have shoulders, you should make a matching set of spacers so your extrusion is perpendicular to the shaft.

    I would set the frame on a table, wheels up to do the alignment.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Rugby, Warwickshire, England
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    I did the second hand 7x12 that I bought by means of much adjustment of the wheel alignment while running. I eventually got the blade to run cleanly on both wheels and not want to wander. The saw had been involved in a 'collision' before I bought it, which made its price more reasonable.

    I wonder if this is one of the very few applications for a laser pointer? A jig could be made with a bit of channel (or similar shaped assembly), with the laser aligned normal to the two legs of the channel. When the channel is pushed against a wheel, the laser will be in line with the wheel and can be used to indicate relative alignment on the opposite wheel, and vice versa...

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Peralta, New Mexico USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Nickel View Post
    -Tack weld to balanced cast-iron wheels, eh? I think we'll save that one for a "last resort" attempt.
    A little slow today? What I said was:

    "I think I'd find a chunk of 3/16 or 1/4 stock long enough to span the wheels and tack some to the edge to reach into each wheel. So maybe 10' of stock to start? You might be able to just clamp things together but it's likely as easy to tack weld it for the job."

    I'll take it a little slower for you.

    Buy a chunk of 4x1/4 about 10' long. Cut a slab long enough to go all the way over both wheels. Cut 2 pieces of the left over long enough to get across 1 wheel each. Take these latter pieces of the 4x1/4 and tack weld them to the first piece of 4x1/4. The 2 edges should reach inside to the wheels without hitting the frame and if you did a decent enough job with the tack welds should be in line with each other, so the wheels can be made parallel and in line with each other.

    Does that clear things up or do I need to draw a picture?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    Doc, that's a nice job of repairing the old repair.

    I was thinking of suggesting tack welding some standoffs to some angle to extend the angle up and out. But notching a "big enough" piece of angle to clear the frame is good too. And while you're at it notch to clear the hub so you can do a good proper check. I'd think that hot rolled should accept the cutouts without any warp if you can do them with "cold" cuts rather than a hot wrench of some flavor

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Nickel View Post
    -....Again, the frame's a welded assembly, and the whole saw has been treated badly over the years (best guess is this thing's pushing 50 years old.) I have no common datum point to measure anything from- I can measure from the wheel to it's own end of the frame, but I have no way of telling if that reference is in any kind of alignment with the other end of the frame. Well, apart from the Mk I Mod. 0 eyeball, but that's been known to fall out of calibration on occasion.

    Doc.
    The "frame" in question would be a piece you make, not the "frame " of the hacksaw. lay two crossieces on the welding table (assuming it is flat), at a suitable distance, and weld or bolt, or use pixie dust to hold a bar between them, so that the assembly can be laid down over the wheels and the alignment checked by seeing if the crosspieces touch the wheels at both ends of the crosspieces...........
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Alaska
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    Doc,

    If you have a small laser pin/pointer, mini mag base with a rigid post and a snug that the pointer will slid into. You can project from various places on the side of the blade wheel to a distant point on a wall or other flat surface. You can get pretty good alignment with a little creativity. I've used that trick several times to bring a round column mill back to the same starting point. The better the laser (fine point) the better your alignment. Projected distance helps with accuracy too. You can find lasers in auto parts stores and most if not all of the big box stores.

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