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Thread: New wheels for the tool grinder- suggestions please?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
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    7,713

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    I grind everything with the standard gray wheel.
    Andy

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    284

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    For HSS roughing I like the pink 38a 46 in the I hardness.
    General purpose wheels are way too hard for HSS. For hand held roughing of HSS I use 46 grit in the I hardness. If you fixture grind and you don’t mind dressing a lot, you could use the softer H wheels. This wheel is soft enough that it will stay sharp and dressing is only necessary to true or shape it. I assure you that you will be amazed as to what a proper wheel will do.

    My advice is to forget the bench grinder and get a nice vertical belt grinder instead. Get one that has a minimum of 1hp and runs at 5000 to 6000 SFM. A 40ish grit zirconia or ceramic belt works great for roughing out HSS tooling and a 300 to 400 grit belt is perfect for that final finish. I found that the belt grinder is much easier to judge angles on and be it lathe bits or drill bits, it’s just a lot easier and faster to get good results. As a bonus you will have a belt grinder! You will soon discover that a belt grinder is one of the most useful machines that you can own, well beyond its initial perceived utility.
    I have a lot of bench grinders and these days they seldom get used, with the exception being the ones that are equipped with wire wheels, surfacing-blending wheels, buffing
    wheels etc.
    Mike

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
    Posts
    9,270

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    Definitely hard to beat a belt grinder for hss roughing. Heck, I often use mine for finishing.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    4,902

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    A belt grinder is something I"ve always wanted. But I'm running out of room so it will need to replace one of the present grinders. And the idea is to keep all the "gritty stuff" over in the welding corner of the garage shop so this is where it has to go. Mind you trading a stone grinder for a belt is a trade I'd happily make.



    Wow, it was so clean and tidy back then..... There's a bit more clutter on the racks now and a few water dipping cups sitting around. I might need to get brutal with reviewing and thinning the stock.... or make more stuff to use it up...

    The trick is that the shelf over the metal rack is only 12" wide. So I'm looking at needing a more vertical arrangement for a belt grinder. And likely won't have the path room for a a 72" long belt. So probably a 48" belt length and live with the reduced belt life.

    But designing that will be another thread...... This one is for new wheels for primarily HSS and carbide grinding with the tool grinder on the left.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    30,392

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    Don't those have water drip pots?

    I routinely "grind" carbide with a Glendo, and just a spritz of water on the wheel before starting totally prevents a dust problem, with any of the available grits. I would think it does not need much to keep it down.

    All the other grinders should have virtually the same problem, either burnt steel particles (rust, basically) or fine particles of abrasive. Carbide is not such a special issue with dust production, all grinding produces dust. You would possibly be well served by a shop vac attachment for the grinder, including a HEPA filter in the vac.

    For that matter, if your grinders are in a far corner of the garage, unless you happen to have a 4 or 6 car garage, dust is getting on the machines, you just do not see it.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    NE Thailand
    Posts
    1,061

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    I have a small T&CG.
    Use a variety of wheels inc Chinese diamond.
    But my go to wheel for 98% of HSS is a white Al OX cup wheel.
    For roughing out shapes on bigger stuff, ie 1/2 or 5/8" sq, nothing beats a 60 or 90 grit belt on the linisher.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    NE Thailand
    Posts
    1,061

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mf205i View Post
    For HSS roughing I like the pink 38a 46 in the I hardness.
    General purpose wheels are way too hard for HSS. For hand held roughing of HSS I use 46 grit in the I hardness. If you fixture grind and you don’t mind dressing a lot, you could use the softer H wheels. This wheel is soft enough that it will stay sharp and dressing is only necessary to true or shape it. I assure you that you will be amazed as to what a proper wheel will do.

    My advice is to forget the bench grinder and get a nice vertical belt grinder instead. Get one that has a minimum of 1hp and runs at 5000 to 6000 SFM. A 40ish grit zirconia or ceramic belt works great for roughing out HSS tooling and a 300 to 400 grit belt is perfect for that final finish. I found that the belt grinder is much easier to judge angles on and be it lathe bits or drill bits, it’s just a lot easier and faster to get good results. As a bonus you will have a belt grinder! You will soon discover that a belt grinder is one of the most useful machines that you can own, well beyond its initial perceived utility.
    I have a lot of bench grinders and these days they seldom get used, with the exception being the ones that are equipped with wire wheels, surfacing-blending wheels, buffing
    wheels etc.
    Mike
    Late to the party.
    Wot he said. +1.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    183

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    I rough tool steel bits on a big 1100W 220V grinder, of 40 kg mass.
    It is extremely fast, much faster than an angle grinder.
    I think 230 mm D, +/-, 30 mm wide.

    Grey wheel, stock.

    The belt sander festool 105 makes flat things flatter, and shiny, with edges getting rounded. Noisy.
    The disc sander of 300 mm D, makes steel bits nice looking and pretty flat, but quite slowly.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    10,536

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    But I'm running out of room
    Surely you jest.
    .

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    N.J.
    Posts
    1,413

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    Not a lot of choice in plate backed wheels for a "Carbide" grinder. At least not a lot of wheels that aren't expensive. I have wheels made by Triumph, last time I bought one they were under $30USD.
    https://www.kbctools.com/CatSearch/5...ght-cup-wheels

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