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Thread: What are the common triangles, OT, laying floors ??

  1. #21
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    None of the corners in my house seem to be square to start with.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    None of the corners in my house seem to be square to start with.
    Maybe you shouldn't have bought an Oast House
    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

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    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
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  3. #23
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    My father always said that every house should have the "square" that was used to build it nailed to the wall. That way the homeowner or subsequent craftsman can at least match the mess that is inevitably present.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    None of the corners in my house seem to be square to start with.
    That's why I don't understand the whole thread. When I lay flooring I pick the straightest, longest wall, scribe the 1st course to it with a direction & width that causes the least problems on the other end, and go. I recently did a 2 floor stairwell where none of the walls nor the existing subfloor planks agreed on a straight line, even the subfloor weaved!

  5. #25
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    The house that I grew up in was older construction, early 1900s or so. I am sure that the framing carpenters knew their craft and did a good job. But they did not use dry wall in those days. The walls were real plaster on metal lathe. And it got thicker at every corner. I don't know why, that's just how they did it. It was on piers and of course, there was setteling and cracks in the plaster. After leveling the floor beams (I helped and it was fun), my poor dad wanted to put plywood paneling in many of the rooms: every corner was a unique and complicated cut. He had to start in the middle of a wall or at a window or door edge and work outwards from there. I watched him carry some corner pieces back and forth from the room he was doing to the garage two, three, even four and five times to get the fit right. And some had to be trashed and a new one begun.

    In short, there was no ONE square that would fit even the two sides of a single corner, much less all the corners of the house. There would have been dozens of squares. And it wasn't just the angle, but the walls met in actual curves. Individually fitted pieces were the only way to match anything.

    It is my understanding that the people who purchased that house removed all the paneling and restored the original, plaster walls.



    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    My father always said that every house should have the "square" that was used to build it nailed to the wall. That way the homeowner or subsequent craftsman can at least match the mess that is inevitably present.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  6. #26
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    It sounds like he is trying to line it up with two or three of the walls where it will probably be very visible AND ALSO come out lined up with the existing flooring in the adjacent room/hall. Most flooring installers will center the new installation between the walls, using either a center strip of flooring or a joint in the center depending on which one provides the widest partial strips at the two sides. They will snap a straight line down the center or offset by half the width of the strips to do this and start there. This looks pretty good. If you start at one wall, you run several risks: that wall may not be straight and you may wind up with a thin strip as you proceed along it and the opposite wall may have a thin, odd looking strip.

    What I do not understand is why he insists on using only triangles with sides that are even integers. Perhaps he did not do well in geometry and trigonometry classes. It would probably be a lot easier to allow fractions and even irrational decimals on the hypotenuse. Heck, there is no real reason for any of the sides to be whole numbers if you are going to be trying to fit them with several criteria. I don't know the existing pattern of the other room or what pattern he wants in this new room, but I would just layout the new pattern and when I got within a few pieces of the existing flooring I would work out the needed pieces from that point by extending the lines of the two patterns until they met. Mark those lines on the sub-flooring and cut the pieces one angle at at time to fit.

    Laying it out in advance with great precision would be difficult; not impossible, but definitely difficult. But you could do a rough layout on paper or with CAD to ensure that the pieces needed at that intersection would be reasonable in size and shape. I would avoid really small pieces if at all possible.



    Quote Originally Posted by gellfex View Post
    That's why I don't understand the whole thread. When I lay flooring I pick the straightest, longest wall, scribe the 1st course to it with a direction & width that causes the least problems on the other end, and go. I recently did a 2 floor stairwell where none of the walls nor the existing subfloor planks agreed on a straight line, even the subfloor weaved!
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    What I do not understand is why he insists on using only triangles with sides that are even integers. Perhaps he did not do well in geometry and trigonometry classes. It would probably be a lot easier to allow fractions and even irrational decimals on the hypotenuse.
    Well, yes. I was going to make a pedantic response to BC's comment about fractional hypotenii (new word?) - a 1X1Xsqrt(2), roughly 1X1X1.414. I'm sure he knows so I didn't remark, but the square root of 2 is an irrational number. As are most of the numbers in the real number realm.

    Irrational doesn't mean crazy - it means, by definition, "not a ratio of two integers". No matter how many decimal places you calculate pi or sqrt(2) you're never going to get to a fraction.

    More OT, how about the ever-popular right triangle 1X2Xsqrt(3)? Pleasing aspect ratio...

    -js (muddying the waters)
    There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

  8. #28
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    Yeah, I did know that. Which is why I agree with you lot that it's just a wonky idea. At some point if we consider enough integer number sides and use a totally off the wall value for the sides I'm sure it would be possible to find a 1.414 hypotenuse that is "close enough" to a full integer. Like within something like a pencil line of .02 or so. But if that means we need an 87 or 103 or some other oddball number of inches for the sides then it's simply not worth the memory space IMO. And it's not like a 3-4-5 ratio isn't just fine and is so much easier to remember. The sides may not be equal but they are both long enough to get a perfectly fine reading.

    I had a very old house for a while. Old wood lath and plaster over. None of that Johnny come lately metal lathe or drywall lath. And the rough mill cut 2x4's in the walls were furry and really were 2x4. I made the mistake of deciding to try my first ever go at wallpaper in that house.... To this day I will not do wallpaper. A close buddy asked me for a hand and I told him he would need to find some other sucker. I'd rather paint three coats on the wall and then carve stencils out of potatoes and color stamp the paint with multiple potato stamps than to ever have anything at all to do with wallpaper ever again. Those walls were all that was described above and likely more.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by reggie_obe View Post
    Could you explain why that would matter? How would room dimension affect (strip) floor layout?
    Strip flooring? Don't see that mentioned anywhere. I assumed tiles, parquet or some type of pattern.

    Whatever he's doing, it seems to matter to Ringo, and that's all that matters.

    Why do so many people have an irresistible need to tell him he doesn't need to know what he wants to know, or that he needs to know something else instead?

    Some people on this forum love to say "There are no stupid questions." And when someone asks a question, they assume it's a stupid one, and answer accordingly.
    Last edited by cameron; 02-11-2019 at 01:28 AM.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter. View Post
    Maybe you shouldn't have bought an Oast House
    May not be an Oast House at all. Might be a geodesic dome.

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