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Thread: OT: The destroyer Fitzgerald's collision with a container vessel

  1. #41
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    Reminds me of the horrible accident during WW2 when the Queen Mary was bringing 20000 US troops to the UK. HMS Curacoa and the Queen Mary were zig zagging , something went wrong, and the cruiser which had 6 inch armour plate, was cut in half with the loss of 338 men. She went down in 4 minutes. Accidents happen unfortunately.

  2. #42
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    He said fella's it's been good to know yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ------------- whwwwwww whwwwww whww wwhwwwhwwwhwwww whwhwhww wwwwwhh whwwhw whwh whwhwhwwwhwhw

  3. #43

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    Ships are scrapped for various reasons. Obsolete most common. When the new enlarged Panama Canal locks were opened many older “Panamax” went to the breakers, some only 15-15 years old, built to have 25 year expected service life. They carried fewer containers and the all important “slot cost” = cost to carry one container, capital and consumable, was much higher.

    As a Practical matter American ships can’t be sent foreign to breakers. Laws prevent the export of potential hazards to health of the scrappers in Alang, probably the worst working conditions In the world. They are stripped of any toxic materials, Asbestos, Lead Paint etc at great cost to the taxpayer in American yards. . If shes sunk for a reef the cost is generally lower than towing the cleaned ship to India

    Boats
    Last edited by boats; 02-12-2019 at 06:47 PM. Reason: Spelling

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by boats View Post
    Ships are scrapped for various reasons. Obsolete most common. When the new enlarged Panama Canal locks were opened many older “Panamax” went to the breakers, some only 15-15 years old, built to have 25 year expected service life. They carried fewer containers and the all important “slot cost” = cost to carry one container, capital and consumable, was much higher.

    As a Practical matter American ships can’t be sent foreign to breakers. Laws prevent the export of potential hazards to health of the scrappers in Alang, probably the worst working conditions In the world. They are stripped of any toxic materials, Asbestos, Lead Paint etc at great cost to the taxpayer in American yards. . If shes sunk for a reef the cost is generally lower than towing the cleaned ship to India

    Boats
    I'm not surprised cargo ships aren't built to last, but you'd think we would sell a 27 year old midsize warship to one of our allies, like a Baltic NATO country. I often kayak fish in Newark Bay, NJ, and watched the Bayonne bridge get raised 60' for the new SuperMax ships. The ships are easy to dodge, it's the tugs with no loads going full throttle that I have to watch for!


  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by gellfex View Post
    How do you figure that works? Any sail yacht has a mast, but that don't make it a ship. Even back in the age of sail, any ship's boat could step a mast. Lastly, those WW2 subs had masts for their radar, and they were definitely boats.
    It's the Naval definition, like it or lump it. Yachts are civilian toys so don't apply. If you want to nit pick about exceptions you are probably a lawyer.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baz View Post
    It's the Naval definition, like it or lump it. Yachts are civilian toys so don't apply. If you want to nit pick about exceptions you are probably a lawyer.
    Not a lawyer but an avid student of naval history. I'm sure of my ground on the subs. Many of them were built by The Electric Boat Company of Groton CT.

    https://www.usni.org/magazines/naval...-and-boats-and

    In general, a boat is a watercraft (for want of a better word) that is small enough to be carried on board a larger one, and that larger one is a ship. This is sometimes expressed this way: “A ship can carry a boat, but a boat can never carry a ship.”
    But definitions change. 200 years ago you could have 2 square rigged masts and still not be a ship, that term was reserved for 3 masts. You were a Brig, or other rig designation.
    Last edited by gellfex; 02-12-2019 at 07:44 PM.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by gellfex View Post
    Out of curiosity I googled her. Why was such a beautiful ship only in commission 27 years? Is that normal? Why scuttled instead of sold off?
    Yeah, pretty sad. The answer for both questions is technology..

    Its a time when the Navy wanted to go with minimally manned war ships. So they were tech heavy.

    As everyone knows from buying a computer its obsolete very quickly, same with ships. She has refitted many times and not cost effective any longer..

    Why not sell her? Tech. Even if obsolete it still has tech that is not cost effective to completely remove, so no dismantling.. And the countries that we do sell them to dont want them anymore.

    She severed her time well.. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  8. #48

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    Way off machining topics but, Look how deep that Maersk vessel is. New Panamamax class calls NJ first. Large China goods Import market Plenty of depth and need to be deep to clear the Bridge even after it was raised. Then Norfolk with deep water no bridges and fast rail connections to the Mid West market. Last port Savannah who has some tidal draft problems but no bridges. Serves the entire SE US They can stack high with empty containers from Savannah too. Those ships only call 3 ports. Can’t serve the others ecconomicly

    Real surprise to many is they return to China East Bound by Suez or Cape of Good Hope, depends on when she’s needed in China. Cape route longer no canal toll. Suez route you can recover lost time at expense of the toll

    Panama transit is one way only due to toll cost and the China - US cargo wants fast transit. US China is mostly Ag Commodity’s or scrap. No need for speed, save money on the voyage.

    Boats

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by boats View Post
    Way off machining topics but, Look how deep that Maersk vessel is. New Panamamax class calls NJ first. Large China goods Import market Plenty of depth and need to be deep to clear the Bridge even after it was raised. Then Norfolk with deep water no bridges and fast rail connections to the Mid West market. Last port Savannah who has some tidal draft problems but no bridges. Serves the entire SE US They can stack high with empty containers from Savannah too. Those ships only call 3 ports. Can’t serve the others ecconomicly

    Real surprise to many is they return to China East Bound by Suez or Cape of Good Hope, depends on when she’s needed in China. Cape route longer no canal toll. Suez route you can recover lost time at expense of the toll

    Panama transit is one way only due to toll cost and the China - US cargo wants fast transit. US China is mostly Ag Commodity’s or scrap. No need for speed, save money on the voyage.

    Boats
    Honestly, most of the ships I see are not so deep. Don't know why. Here's another shot of more coming in, when they should be deep. Are these not supermax, so they stopped at those other ports 1st? Note, you can still see the old deck of the bridge in the 2nd one. I hope someone has been taking a time lapse of that project! It was cool to watch.




  10. #50

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    The first Maersk ship is fairly large perhaps 95,000 tons 2nd small. She looks like one of the Flaged In American ships carrying government cargo. The MSC is also a big one, not the biggest Those ships can call Boston Baltimore Wilmington NC Charleston and Jacksonville Its a squeeze in some of those too. Miami can take about anything but limited cargo flow keeps the big ones away.

    The new Panamax classes any owner all about the same design are identified by Bridge Forward, Engine spaces aft. They have a flat appearence to the top. Stack not higher than the containers. 145,000 DWT Don’t apear all that large until you see them beside a 95,000 tonner. Not only port size restricted they save money by calling fewer ports and steaming slower which means need to keep to major ports only.

    Boats
    Last edited by boats; 02-12-2019 at 10:49 PM.

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