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Thread: 1938 Pontiac Master Cylinder Sleeve

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Mass
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    374

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    Quote Originally Posted by RichR View Post
    Maybe it's the angle the picture was taken at, but that looks like a 6 jaw chuck to me.
    Right - i made the stub shaft in a Bison 6 jaw - that was just checking the thread. The cylinder was worked on in a 4 jaw.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Somerset UK
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    1,972

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    Nice work, could you tell everyone what tools you used to get the turning and boring done?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    364

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    Agree with RichR, first picture looks like a 6 jaw. However the third is a 4 jaw. Anyway, a nice job and the finish looks very nice.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Mass
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    OK - tools I used were just a simple flat top TPG 332 insert on the OD, and a SECO WNMG 432 insert on the boring bar. I don't know the grades. OD was done at moderate speed, and the ID was done real slow in the back gears and with a 0.022 feed.

    pics of the car when i picked it up - has not run in 20 years, and still has a 1967 inspection sticker in the windsheild




  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Collierville, TN
    Posts
    3,479

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    Nice job on a grand ol' car and it looks to be in great shape! Gotta love those suicide doors. Thanks for posting.

    (ps: With my luck the Loctite would have grabbed with the sleeve half way in. )
    Milton

    "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

    "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    5,990

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    That was a good fix. I had to do the same thing to my Delta drill press. Bore and sleeve it for the quill. This brings back memories.

    JL...................

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Buffalo NY USA
    Posts
    212

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Powell View Post
    .....
    I made the sleeves a sliding fit, as recommended for the green loctite I used.
    My customer expressed concern that if the loctite failed then the sleeves in the slave cylinders might move outwards if pressure got under the blind end of the bores
    . I do not believe that likely, but wonder whether it is a poor idea to sleeve single ended slave cylinders without mechanically locking the sleeves from movement.
    .....
    Can anyone who has experience of this sort of work please comment.
    Regards David Powell.
    Back in the 1990's I was employed in a shop that serviced heavy equipment such as semi trucks and Caterpillars. It was routine to use the green Loctite sleeve locker on replacement sleeves for the pins. Said pins were in the range of 3" dia 4140 and took static loads up to 50 tons. Dunno what the shock loading was. In fact, Caterpillar included the Locktite in their overhaul kits, with a chart specifying the clearances. So yes, I'd say its OK to use the green Locktite and follow the manufacturers instructions.

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