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Thread: Lathe unloading

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Philadelphia
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    195

    Default Lathe unloading

    I have decided to get rid of my 1928 South Bend 9" Junior in favor of something bigger. I'm looking at South Bend 13s and my only real hesitation is unloading it. I have a 1st floor drive-out basement and while a rented engine hoist was plenty for the 9", I'm worried about picking up the heavy end of the 13" with a hoist that's rated for 1500 lbs.

    There must be other people who have dealt with this. What's the accepted wisdom?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    2,793

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    I have a 1 ton HF engine hoist that lifted a 1200 lb. 12" lathe. Wished I got the 2 ton version, but it did it.
    Last edited by RB211; 02-11-2019 at 07:22 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    SF East Bay.
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    6,317

    Default

    One possible problem is to use the boom fully extended without de-rating the lifting capacity. A load leveler is a good idea when you get equipment that big.
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Coast, USA
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    2 Ton cranes with 4 boom positions are rated at 4000 lbs with boom in. 3000 lbs with boom out one hole. 2000 lbs with boom out two holes. and 1000 lbs with boom out 3 holes.

    Work hard play hard

  5. #5
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    Dec 2015
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    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    Commander, pull off a few of the pieces to make it a bit lighter as well as better balanced. The tailstock is one obvious part. And if it's a version with the motor out the rear on a frame with a jack shaft remove the motor and frame. If the chuck is a big one remove that as well. And while they often don't weigh much pull off the end cover that protects the gearing. By that time the weight should be down a fair bit.

    My own lift is the same one as shown above but in yellow. Otherwise exactly the same. To make it easier to maneuver around the shop I shortened the legs by about a foot. This means I can't use the .5 ton lift position because the hook is out past the wheels. But that's OK and I don't use that spot anyway. And it was a fair tradeoff for the maneuverability. I actually used part of the cutoff to make up a riser block to get back the vertical height.

    Here it is sitting on the 1T position about to lift the lathe up onto the new pedestals as detailed in an older thread. The weight on the lathe is up around 1000lbs and the lift went easily with no strain or even with very much wobbling of the arm with each pump of the lift handle.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    East Coast, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    To make it easier to maneuver around the shop I shortened the legs by about a foot. This means I can't use the .5 ton lift position because the hook is out past the wheels.
    My shop crane is the non-folding version but it has telescoping legs. When the legs are fully retracted and I have the boom all the way out, I sometimes just stand on the back of the crane (or just keep one foot holding it down) instead of bothering to extend the legs out. I'm guessing the folding version has longer legs than the telescoping version when fully retracted as it does want to tip forward when fully extended way past the legs. I bet you'd be surprised how little weight you need to add to the back on your crane to keep it from tipping forward on the 1/2T setting. I often "ride" on the back when I'm too lazy to extend the legs out.

    I have the legs fully extended in this picture, and I stuck a SCH40 pipe in the boom to help lift a wooden crate off.

    Work hard play hard

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    5,990

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    Commander, pull off a few of the pieces to make it a bit lighter as well as better balanced. The tailstock is one obvious part. And if it's a version with the motor out the rear on a frame with a jack shaft remove the motor and frame. If the chuck is a big one remove that as well. And while they often don't weigh much pull off the end cover that protects the gearing. By that time the weight should be down a fair bit.

    My own lift is the same one as shown above but in yellow. Otherwise exactly the same. To make it easier to maneuver around the shop I shortened the legs by about a foot. This means I can't use the .5 ton lift position because the hook is out past the wheels. But that's OK and I don't use that spot anyway. And it was a fair tradeoff for the maneuverability. I actually used part of the cutoff to make up a riser block to get back the vertical height.

    Here it is sitting on the 1T position about to lift the lathe up onto the new pedestals as detailed in an older thread. The weight on the lathe is up around 1000lbs and the lift went easily with no strain or even with very much wobbling of the arm with each pump of the lift handle.

    I have to ask, where is the chain wrapped? Looks like something is wrapped around the back of the chuck and under the bed rails. Picture is not clear enough to tell.

    JL..............

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    central MA
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    282

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    Unloading is just one part of this exercise. How will the lathe be loaded, and what are you doing for secure transport?

    It's been my experience with moving lathes that keeping them as close to solid ground as possible throughout the move helps to lessen unnecessary excitement in the adventure. No matter which method you use, for best results the machine needs to be stabilized by extending the machine's footprint with bracing attached to the base. Put some beams under the head stock running perpendicular to the bed ways. Four inch square posts about four feet in length bolted to the head stock bell casting should work. Notch them first for a pallet truck. Do the same for the tail stock end, but only one beam is needed. Install the beam under the tail stock end first, then raise and secure the heavier head stock end. Do this before the machine leaves its present location. I've seen too many lathes do a face plant during transport, turning a once good machine into junk just because they lacked bracing. Remember that a lathe is top heavy.

    If you decide to sling the lathe with an overhead crane move the carriage and tail stock away from the head stock. Place the sling near the head stock, wrapping around the first web. Once you start lifting move the tail stock and carriage further away to find the best balance point.
    Last edited by tom_d; 02-11-2019 at 11:58 PM.

  9. #9
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    Dec 2015
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    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    I have to ask, where is the chain wrapped? Looks like something is wrapped around the back of the chuck and under the bed rails. Picture is not clear enough to tell.

    JL..............
    It is. I wouldn't do it that way again but it survived OK. Some wood blocks not in place in this picture were also used to hold the chain out of contact with some of the more tender spots like the edges of the bed rails and the feed and switching rods on the front. I've since learned that this is not the best way by a long shot and I would not do it the same way in the future.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
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    2,927

    Default

    One of the best ways I've seen to lift a lathe is like this...





    The one I made to lift my 9" SB lathes has an amply large angle iron on the bottom and a 4x4 block of wood on the top with a single long 5/8" eyebolt coming up between the ways with the eye well above them. I used a short piece of pipe with washers on both ends between the 4x4 and the eye of the eyebolt. I can slide it along the ways to find the balance point and once tightened down, it is rock solid secure.
    Last edited by Arcane; 02-12-2019 at 05:12 AM.

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