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Thread: hazards of using epoxy

  1. #31

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    Was thinking of this thread today, I'm so glad to be on the metal side rather than woodworking. No more headaches from saw dust. I'll take the chance with epoxy any day!

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    100

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    Quote Originally Posted by 6PTsocket View Post
    Wow, my head is still spinning from that one. Surprisingly, none of them is far gone.When covered with the white decomposition product, it scrubs right off looking as good as new. I am surprised they don't show signs of erosion. If I am going to take a shot, what would be your choice for an encapsulator? It has to be tough, moderately chemical resistant to what is around a home shop and not dissolve the CAB. Any suggestions greatly appreciated and you are absolved for a bad guess. This subject comes up on several forums. People get rid of the tools or live with it but nobody suggests a solution. How are you on my idea for a moisture cure urethane or even a catalysed one? I would prefer not to spray for the same reasons mentioned in the epoxy discussion. I spoke with a guy at 3M safety and he said isocyanates in brush or dip form are not nearly as bad as in aerosol form and I could wear gloves and for extra protection ,a fresh P95 mask. Thanks again.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
    I have not had much or actually any practical personal contact with that type of plastic as CAB. From what I can see in chemical resistance charts it seems that CAB is more or less susceptible to most organic solvents. This might not neccessarily be a bad thing though. If one just applies a thin topcoat that cures quickly, then the intersolubility of materials may form actually a better stronger bond. But if one leaves the tool in a vat of solvent for prolonged time then of course harm shall arise.
    Urethanes seem like a shot worth taking, as to which one (water cured or 2k) is better....honestly I do not know without knowing the exact composition of both the plastic and encapsulator and there are many different variations.
    I suggest you choose an encapsulator that matches your needs towards durability and appearance, but as far as the interaction with the underlaying plastic goes, this be a purely trial and error type of venture. As I mentioned before.....choose one subject that is not too dearly attached to your heart and submit it to testing. Nothing that I could say or suggest would top your personal experience with the actual materials at hand

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chilliwack, B.C.
    Posts
    11,579

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    I wonder if carnuba wax would work to encapsulate the cab plastic. I would do a full clean and dry, using little in the way of chemicals. Then apply and buff the wax as you normally would.

    I have a few tools that have this problem. I recently purchased a set of sockets that were made by Xcellite back in the day, and a couple sets of allen wrenches with the same problem. This isn't severe enough to need a solution, but there are a few tools I have where the handles absolutely stink. Perhaps I'll find these and try the wax thing myself.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    9,226

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    I use J.B. Weld fairly often, and have never noticed any kind of smell associated with it.
    Brian Rupnow

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    2,496

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    Go open the tube of white hardener, squeeze out a small dollop, smear it out and give that a whiff. It is a unique smell.
    I don't mind it, but out of the many hundreds of chemicals I have used, it possesses a rather unique odor.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    269

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    Quote Originally Posted by markx View Post
    I have not had much or actually any practical personal contact with that type of plastic as CAB. From what I can see in chemical resistance charts it seems that CAB is more or less susceptible to most organic solvents. This might not neccessarily be a bad thing though. If one just applies a thin topcoat that cures quickly, then the intersolubility of materials may form actually a better stronger bond. But if one leaves the tool in a vat of solvent for prolonged time then of course harm shall arise.
    Urethanes seem like a shot worth taking, as to which one (water cured or 2k) is better....honestly I do not know without knowing the exact composition of both the plastic and encapsulator and there are many different variations.
    I suggest you choose an encapsulator that matches your needs towards durability and appearance, but as far as the interaction with the underlaying plastic goes, this be a purely trial and error type of venture. As I mentioned before.....choose one subject that is not too dearly attached to your heart and submit it to testing. Nothing that I could say or suggest would top your personal experience with the actual materials at hand
    Thanks again for all your efforts. Greatly appreciated.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    269

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    Quote Originally Posted by brian Rupnow View Post
    I use J.B. Weld fairly often, and have never noticed any kind of smell associated with it.
    Me either. I think I'll leave glue sniffing to the usual suspects. Whenever I use epoxy or urethanes the danger of isocyanates and contact dermatitis and becoming sensitized is always in the back of my mind. BTW, I have found another JB product that I have had great success with. It is called JB bonder. It is a urethane that comes in the double syringe format in black an almost white, light tan. It is sold as a plastic cement, often used for automotive repair. It dries completely in a couple of hours and the stuff seems to stick to almost anything. Hard plastic, rubbery vinyl, non plastics. It probably would not work on the infamous low energy plastics like polypropelyne, polyethelene, delrin and teflon. I got the tan and it dries glossy translucent. Do not confuse this with their similar Plastic Welder or the 2 part Plastic Welder 2 part putty. It dries hard but does not seem brittle. I found both colors in the local Wally World. I hope all the reactive solvents have gassed off,one of the things I fixed was a crack in an immersion blender. It has been a couple of weeks.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

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