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Thread: Slitting saw advice

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    103

    Default Slitting saw advice

    Will need to slit on my mill soon. Cut will be 1/4 wide not deep or long. Rifle barrel extractor grove. My mill is a Rockwell itís not big or powerful. Might as well set up for slitting future jobs too.

    Looking at Arbors either R8 or run in a collet, whatís the best choice. If I go collet what about shank size. Other question is what size saw hole and should I set up for, keyed or no key.

    All comments apreceated

    Boats

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
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    Helsinki, Finland, Europe
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    3,087

    Default

    Why do you need slitting saw for rifle barrel extractor groove? No tilting head or table in the mill?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    103

    Default

    It tilts, guys that barrel this particular action (Stevens 44 1/2 ) all use slitting saws . Falling block the cut is at 6 o’clock on the face and goes all the way through the threads. Bolt action on the side set up is different . Say they get a better cut than end mills. Besides don’t have one want try it. Have a scrap barrel to pratice on.

    Boats

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Deep in the Heart of Texas!
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    7,876

    Default

    I would consider a 1/4" a milling cutter and for sure go with an arbor--Keyed if your cutter has a keyway. Get the cutter then get the arbor to match. I just ordered a few sets of gear cutters and had to order 16 and 22mm arbors. I already had a 1" arbor for cutters. Tooling keeps stacking up.

    Also, is the large radius of the cutter a requirement for a blend? If a smaller radius would work, consider using a keyway cutter.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Long Island, N.Y.
    Posts
    2,609

    Default

    Looking at Arbors either R8 or run in a collet, what’s the best choice. If I go collet what about shank size. Other question is what size saw hole and should I set up for, keyed or no key.
    I made my own arbor, 3/4" straight shank held in a 3/4" R8 collet. My preference is no key. If it jams, I'd rather it spins on the arbor than breaks or
    tears something else up. A straight shank also lets you pull it further out of the collet if you need more reach or push it further in if you need more
    table to blade headroom.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    394

    Default

    I have a Rockwell too and found it too fast for most larger dia. tools. What I did was take the aluminum motor mount casting off the top, make a square 1/2" steel plate to replace it and build a frame work on of the plate extending to the back where it is supported at the end of the round bar the head is mounted on. This frame work is basically a "longer" motor mount that allows mounting the motor at the back of the mill with the original motor on an idler shaft in the original motor position. Then I put a small cone pulley on the motor. I can now get down to about 90 rpm I think. Slow enough for larger dia. tools and I seldom need faster speeds than this setup allows but they are available by switching the belts positions from upper belt to lower belt etc. It has made the mill much nicer to use for most work.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    103

    Default

    Stacking up unnessary tooling is what I want to avoid. Cut should be flat bottomed but it’s not critical. Saw ought to slice through leaving it flat same as if I cut it with a hacksaw. Hacksaw and file is how was done in home shops back in the day.

    Thanks all will digest & may have a few more questions.

    Boats

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anderson SC
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boats View Post
    Stacking up unnessary tooling is what I want to avoid. Cut should be flat bottomed but it’s not critical. Saw ought to slice through leaving it flat same as if I cut it with a hacksaw. Hacksaw and file is how was done in home shops back in the day.

    Thanks all will digest & may have a few more questions.

    Boats
    I built a couple gatling guns and cut the extractor relief in the barrels (10 barrels) using a woodruff key cutter. Its very rigid and does a nice job.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    NE Ohio USA
    Posts
    30

    Default

    One mistake I've seen many newbs make is running the slitter too fast or feeding too fast. Calculate correct speeds and feeds for the cutter before you start. When using a HSS slitter I never start faster than 60 RPM. Then I will move up to the correct speed judging by chatter and feel. Often you will have a slight variation in concentricity of the cutter teeth causing it to cycle during the cut. So feed in slowly until you get the hang of it. Hope this helps.

    Best Regards,
    Bob

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    432

    Default

    I just purchased an R8 stub arbor to use horizontal cutters on my Bridgeport. Shars currently has one on sale for $31.95 that will accommodate 1" ID cutters. The one I bought will take up to a 2" wide cutter. I would normally do slitting on the horizontal mill, but at 40+" long and 8" wide the part is to big for my horizontal mill.

    https://www.shars.com/1-stub-milling-machine-arbor-1



    They also have an R8 slotting saw arbor for $23.30 that will take multiple diameter saws. The slotting saw arbor isn't keyed like the one I purchased.

    https://www.shars.com/slotting-saw-arbor-r8-shank
    Last edited by projectnut; 03-14-2019 at 12:18 PM.

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