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Thread: CNC Shaper

  1. #11
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    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by metalmagpie View Post
    I don't quite agree with your statement that shapers usually have auto downfeed.
    -They don't, usually, but some do. My old 1905 Stockbridge has an auto downfeed, tripped by a pawl mounted to a T-slot on one of the top way rails.

    Hmmm-I don't see why any standard CNC software controller couldn't do it. You'd need to hand write your G-Code, though, unless you figured out how to make a shaper post-processor for a CAM program....
    -I suppose it might be possible, I'm about the last guy to say what a given piece of software can and can't do.

    But the reason I said it was the way the shaper operates- to a very limited extent you likely won't be able to have the clapper move vertically during the cut, simply because the clapper assembly, screw and stepper won't have the power or rigidity to essentially make the cut on their own. (That is, the stepper/servo would have to try and push the tool deeper into the work, which will take a great deal of force.)

    Therefore, for the most part, the CNC'ed shaper will be limited to 2D profiles. Which should be easy, given that waterjets, routers and plasma cutters all operate in essentially 2D, but in this case, you'll have to have a sensor or trigger or switch of some kind that tells the controller when the ram has completed its cycle.

    Since the ram is not under precision control, the controller never knows where it is, exactly, unless there's a sensor. So it'll have to be a case of the software waiting until the ram reaches the full-back stroke before moving the tool. A second sensor would be necessary to let the controller know when it's reached full-forward, so it can raise the tool for the return stroke.

    I honestly have no idea if any modern CNC package could be tweaked to operate such a thing, but it'd be fun to know if it could.

    I'd also like to be a fly on the wall when somebody calls Vectric or Autodesk or something, and asks for a post-processor for a CNC 24" Cincinnati shaper.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by strokersix View Post
    Just to be clear, the ram stroke is still the original mechanicals in these concepts correct?

    For more CNC vertical stroke perhaps you could motorize the table elevation instead of the compound. Advantage motor assembly can be mounted stationary, disadvantage lose some rigidity.

    Do you really even need a compound anymore?
    The rotation and slide movement on the ram let you do dovetails, for instance.

    The normal shaper operation would have slide movement take place during the return stroke of the ram. It's why the clapper box is required because transverse movement for the next stroke would be trying to jam the bit sideways into the work while going backwards. The lift of the clapper let's the tool get up out of the way when it needs to. The very fast movement of the stepper does give the opportunity for sideways movement to occur in the very short time on the return.

    I don't know how this guy set his sensors for stroke position, but a Hall effect sensor on the bull gear would give more than enough accuracy.
    .
    "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Bulliss View Post
    Am guessing it's Model Engineer's Workshop that it's in. I would have remembered Nambia.
    Uff Da! Of course you're right.
    .
    "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

  4. #14
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    Id think 3 axis would be the ticket. Tool rotation would really provide tremendous capability. External and internal gears and splines for instance with very simple tools.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TGTool View Post
    The rotation and slide movement on the ram let you do dovetails, for instance.
    Seems to me if you motorized the table elevation and side to side travel you could cut a dovetail just fine without the compound. At least in concept.

  6. #16
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    May 2011
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    I don't think you would even need gcode. Coding a stepper to run a specific distance (or rotate a specific number of degrees) while synchronized with other steppers running other distances or rotating is quite easy to do.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
    I don't understand about the clapper as presumably the tool is still dragged back across the work. Unless of course he uses his control of the downfeed to lift the tool for the back stroke.

    One interesting possibility is that his machine may be able to shape various contours.

    I am looking at my little Adept 2 power shaper with a new interest.
    Quote Originally Posted by metalmagpie View Post
    I don't quite agree with your statement that shapers usually have auto downfeed.

    My Varnamo Shaper was original equipped with tool lifter when using carbide cutters,unfortunately it was missing when I got it.
    It also had auto down feed with 4 different feed rates.

  8. #18
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    Apr 2017
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    Peerless shaper has a downfeed.
    We had an 18 inch Peerless innthe shop, nice machine.

  9. #19
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    No big deal to keep track of bull wheel position and even easier if it is driven by a stepper. Furthermore if ram is driven by a stepper the length of stroke could be controlled.

    Vertical and horizontal feeds could be a fairly conventional stepper drives.

    The machine would be hugely improved with a digital controlled rotary table usable in horizontal and vertical axii making inner splines and gear cutting a cinch.

  10. #20
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    I put a down feed on my little Adept shaper, I don't use it much but when I do I am glad I have it as a manual vertical feed is somewhat difficult.

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