Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: Dyeing traps

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    NW Oregon
    Posts
    1,007

    Default Dyeing traps

    I had my fill of rodents. I bought 6 new long spring #1 traps. Would like them to not get too rusty.

    Reading on the internet it seems that you can dye the metal traps using anything from maple leaves and bark to black walnuts in the husk.

    So my question isn't whether it works or not but rather what is the process that takes place and does it indeed protect metal left out in the rain?

    Thanks,
    Abner

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Hawkes Bay New Zealand
    Posts
    227

    Default

    Hi Abner Raw linseed oil painted on then left in the sun for a few days until it dries and hardens will protect short term.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    In the desert
    Posts
    1,141

    Default

    I always liked boiling animal traps in water and creosote leaves.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    North west California
    Posts
    1,103

    Default

    When I ran a trap line I boiled black walnut hulls in water. Get a container fill near full with water. Put in walnut hulls and traps, tie wire on trap chain so everything is under water, when water is boiling add Bees Wax to container, just enough to coat the traps as they are pulled out. Boil for about hour then pull the traps one at a time so they get a light coat of Bees Wax and hang to cool and dry. This had always lasted the season. Grease or other things will have the critters licking the traps. If you are after rats a 5gallon bucket with about 4 -6 inches of water has worked well for me.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fletcher, NC
    Posts
    211

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Sunny So Cal
    Posts
    4,694

    Default

    Oh Abner. I am not a fan of traps. Not a fan of frickin rodents runnin around also.

    My Dad catches 1-3 a month. The type you prolly use.

    He doesnt do anything to the . No cleaning, preserving or anything.

    Set it and forget it. Traps are not as good when they are pretty lil pieces of art work.

    Dont ever clean the old bait off. Just renew it. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    NW Oregon
    Posts
    1,007

    Default

    Oh my rodent problem is a little more severe. I live in a forestry area, rodents are amazingly prolific! I catch on average 2 mice per day with 5 traps for the last 2 1/2 months, add to that 12 chipmunks, 1 rabbit, and 2 voles.
    I usually buy bait by the 5 gallon bucket and have special bait stations to protect other wildlife. I like having a body count plus having rodents die in vehicles, tractors, and inside walls can be stinky. It also concerns me about after kill - predators eating poisoned rodents. I use the better mouse trap and victor #1 long spring.
    I have developed a good working relationship with a pair of ravens. I toss the carcasses out in the same place each day and they come and eat them. It's getting comical at least to me where they sit in the trees and watch me. Most of the bigger rodents like the chipmunks have visible engorged ticks, so I am quite happy with the arrangement.

    I'm going to try and boil my traps in maple bark because it is all I have at the moment. After that some linseed oil because I have it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,680

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Abner View Post
    I usually buy bait by the 5 gallon bucket and have special bait stations to protect other wildlife.
    The bait is attracting them and likely substantially worsening the problem.

    In that way it is a gimmick by the bait companies. Animal smells food? Where is it it?! Gotta go wherever that food is! And then you need to buy more bait because there are so many of them - drawn in by your poison bait.

    Keep'em out, don't attract them, repel them. Though outside vehicle storage is so hard. I once tried Irish Spring Sport soap bars in a vehicle outside. Powerful smelling deoderant soap. I broke each bar into thirds and put them on the floor of the vehicle. The mice ate it! And it surely attracted them. And the soap was so strong smelling I couldn't use it.

    You chose to live in the woods, with the animals. It shouldn't be a free kill zone.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anderson SC
    Posts
    1,317

    Default

    A outdoor cat or two would be a easy approach.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    152

    Default

    I think a lot of the rodent problems are related to our breaking the cycle of predators and prey. When the predators are absent, other means are necessary for controlling the prey population.

    The baits are bad from another direction. We have mouse problems in our seasonal cottage. I do not use the poison baits, but the neighbors do, and as a consequence, we have bloody diarrhea tracks in our cottage.

    And mice are a serious health concern:


    • Salmonellosis – Salmonellosis is caused by the Salmonella bacteria and can be contracted by consuming food or water that has been contaminated with rodent droppings. People suffering from this illness usually experience intestinal distress including cramping and diarrhea as well as a high fever, and while symptoms typically abate within a week, there are occasions where the infection spreads to the blood stream and more extreme medical measures must be taken.



    • Leptospirosis – Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection that is usually spread by coming into contact with the urine of affected animals, but it can be spread through other bodily fluids as well. Because mice urinate wherever they go, ingesting goods from containers where rodents have been foraging, or preparing food on surfaces where they travel, are common ways to become sick. Typically, leptospirosis causes fever, chills, diarrhea, and vomiting, but if it’s left untreated, it can lead to kidney or liver failure as well as meningitis. Leptospirosis is also very harmful and often fatal to household pets.



    • Toxoplasmosis – Toxoplasmosis is caused by a parasite contained in the feces of mice and other mammals. Humans can contract it directly from mice through consuming food where rodents have left droppings. Cats who eat these infected mice are also susceptible to the disease, and failing to wash your hands thoroughly after cleaning a litterbox puts you at risk for contraction. While symptoms are normally of the flu-like variety and pass after several weeks, toxoplasmosis is incredibly dangerous to women who are pregnant and can lead to birth defects or miscarriage.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •