Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Welding Table Structure

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Milwaukee
    Posts
    1,087

    Default Welding Table Structure

    I need to get my welding table built so I can resume the garage rearrangement so the 'Cuda will fit when I get it out of storage. I have a 1/2" thick 3' x 6' plate for the top. For the frame and legs I have 1 1/2" -1/8" thick square tubing. I'd love to have heavier material but nothing big will ever be on there, but at the same time I have to ask - Should I get bigger material for the legs? I will be parking the welder cart, tank, and a rolling tool cabinet underneath and it will have 5" castors. It probably won't get moved around much.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    SF East Bay.
    Posts
    6,624

    Default

    The steel should weigh in at around 375 lbs. I'd think that the tubing that you are planning to use will be sufficient. You will want to cross brace the legs just in case you end up with stresses / loads that are not vertical.

    Dan
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    In the desert
    Posts
    1,427

    Default

    Full frame with casters for my 3x7 welding table frame with 4x8 top. I have a couple tool boxes, three welders, and a saw along with various welding supplies and accessories on the bottom shelf above the casters now. I can still lift it with the lever arms, but I have to slide a cheater bar in them. Its solid on the floor. I wouldn't hesitate to stand on it. I did go with 9 legs end elevator bolts for leveling when its not on the casters. I used 2 x 2 x .120 tube, and use 1.5 x 1.5 x .120 for table extensions and cheater bars in the caster levers. We tacked up the entire table, and then my son and I took turns welding out almost continuously. Even the Miller 212 started to see some heat after 30 minutes of nearly continuous welding. (The 212 does not sit on the table. It has its own casters.)

    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Milwaukee
    Posts
    1,087

    Default

    Looks like I could park my truck on that dude. Way more support than I'm looking for. I hope to keep much of the underneath open so I can move tools/cabinets in and out under their own power, where that makes sense. But, that does give me a good start for some of the bracing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Northeast, PA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default

    Might be a little late to this thread but that 1/2" plate is most likely not going to be flat. If being flat matters to you, put some design into the frame to pull/push your top as flat as you can get it. That does mean that your frame needs to be able to handle pushing 1/2" plate around.

    I have a 4'x4' table with a 1/2" top I made. For the most part it is flat enough but one of these days I am going to cut the top back off and get it straightened out. Not having a flat table really adds to fab time and frustration.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Milwaukee
    Posts
    1,087

    Default

    Not too late. Just go the area cleared so I can work. It has been flat enough for what I've been doing, but it is a good point and I'll take it under consideration.

    Right now I'm trying to decide how to do the casters so I can move it, but I want/need solid feet for it to rest on and adjust level once in place. Seen several versions in google searches but most are more complicated than what I need. I won't be moving it often so don't need a cam system to jack it on/off the casters.

    What would be the max height you'd want the top at? To get the welder cart or other stuff underneath is going to require going higher than what appears reasonable. I'm 6'2" and do prefer a bit taller work surface.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Waukesha, WI
    Posts
    1,366

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gzig5 View Post
    Not too late. Just go the area cleared so I can work. It has been flat enough for what I've been doing, but it is a good point and I'll take it under consideration. Right now I'm trying to decide how to do the casters so I can move it, but I want/need solid feet for it to rest on and adjust level once in place. Seen several versions in google searches but most are more complicated than what I need. I won't be moving it often so don't need a cam system to jack it on/off the casters..
    I have used large bolts or threaded rod to make jacks that you screw down to the floor to override the casters. You have to loosen the anchor screws to move it, but it doesn't sound like you need to scoot it around alot. Machine the floor end of the 'leg' to a point and then place them in a center drilled steel pad with a rubber pad on the bottom.

    Quote Originally Posted by gzig5 View Post
    What would be the max height you'd want the top at? To get the welder cart or other stuff underneath is going to require going higher than what appears reasonable. I'm 6'2" and do prefer a bit taller work surface.
    I don't know what you plan to build on the table, but I would make sure that I can reach the center to be able to weld comfortably. I had a prefab table that was only 30" from the floor, but most of the stuff that was on it was high enough that that height made sense. It was a 2' X 12' cast iron table that was NOT portable, it was located directly under the centerline of a small material handling hoist mounted on a rail... it had switches to shuttle the hoist from one track to the other.
    paul
    ARS W9PCS

    Esto Vigilans

    Remember, just because you can doesn't mean you should...
    but you may have to

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Milwaukee
    Posts
    1,087

    Default

    I'm just doing general "stuff" and restoring my 73 Plymouth Cuda, which needs a lot of metal work. The more I think about it, the more I see I'm not going to be able to get the welder under it on the cart it is currently on. It would need 40-41" of clearance to the bottom of the table and I think that is getting a bit too high.
    Most of my machines are on pads like you describe but the 3/8-1/2" bolts I usually use seemed wimpy for the table, but in reality should work.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    UK, near London
    Posts
    1,291

    Default

    Only have half an inch of screw protruding which is enough for levelling and makes it less wibbly-wobbly. Make the wheels the bit that move down when needed and use the trolley jack for moving one end which is even easier.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Waukesha, WI
    Posts
    1,366

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gzig5 View Post
    I'm just doing general "stuff" and restoring my 73 Plymouth Cuda, which needs a lot of metal work. The more I think about it, the more I see I'm not going to be able to get the welder under it on the cart it is currently on. It would need 40-41" of clearance to the bottom of the table and I think that is getting a bit too high.
    Most of my machines are on pads like you describe but the 3/8-1/2" bolts I usually use seemed wimpy for the table, but in reality should work.
    The Cuda project sounds like fun. You sure you don't want to build a rotisserie instead of a table?

    My background in construction/industrial plumbing kind of leans to overkill... I was thinking more like 3/4" or 7/8" bolts. I typically use a rod coupling instead of a nut to weld to the frame, the added length of thread engagement makes things less wobbly. A jam nut will also prevent any tendency to wobble once the height is set.

    Since I retired I have less scrap kicking around. My inner pack-rat is sad :<( but I would not trade retirement for anything. When asked if I miss working I always say I don't miss the work, but I do miss the people.

    FWIW I have been a ham radio operator for 47 years and only recently got bit by the DX bug and now have worked 24 countries since last Friday. Even less time for work.
    paul
    ARS W9PCS

    Esto Vigilans

    Remember, just because you can doesn't mean you should...
    but you may have to

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •