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Thread: Anyone using Solid Edge?

  1. #1
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    Default Anyone using Solid Edge?

    A recent episode of the HSM podcast prompted me to have a look at CAD software. I've been getting by with pencil and paper, but it's time to upgrade.

    I briefly tried all the packages mentioned in the podcast, and really liked Solid Edge. I don't know enough to compare the features, but it seems like they all give similar results if you know how to use them.

    Does anyone else here use it? Is there any reason not to spend time learning it?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinstripe View Post
    Does anyone else here use it? Is there any reason not to spend time learning it?
    Yes. The license and cost may change dramatically at any time. So your investment in learning the product may become obsolete. It happens all too often.

    An open source product like Libre CAD will always be completely free.

  3. #3
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    I use it at work, and Autodesk Inventor at home. I know some other CADs, like AutoCAD, Solid Works, CATIA.

    In my opinion, I would select other instead of Solid Edge. It has some weird behaviour some times, is too rigid and no so much user friendly. It's common to hear me or other colleages swearing about it when crashes.

    My recomendation is to select one that is more user friendly, like Inventor or Solid Works. You have Fusion 360 too, that being free, powerfull and with lots of tutorials in YouTube can be a great start (with CAM too). Anyways, once you know to use one, the basic concept is the same for the others (except AutoCAD, that is more 2D based, or CATIA, that is severly user unfriendly).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    Yes. The license and cost may change dramatically at any time. So your investment in learning the product may become obsolete. It happens all too often.
    That's one of the nice things about it. The license is free for hobbyists and never expires. I installed it in a VM without a network connection and it worked with the date set to 2029. It doesn't phone home to activate and you don't need to renew the license. That may change in future, but the current version will keep working forever.

    See https://solidedge.siemens.com/en/sol...ts-and-makers/

    The Solid Edge Student Edition is available not only to traditional students, but also self-taught learners, including makers and hobbyists practicing their craft for personal satisfaction, not monetary gain. Create 3D models for printing and prototyping. The license never expires.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by DEVILHUNTER View Post
    In my opinion, I would select other instead of Solid Edge. It has some weird behaviour some times, is too rigid and no so much user friendly. It's common to hear me or other colleages swearing about it when crashes.
    Thanks. It did crash twice for me as well, but only in one file and only while panning around. I've spent hours on it since without a hiccup. Fusion 360 went through a phase where it wouldn't open for several hours (internet connection was fine, but the window remained blank).

    Are you using the current version (SE 2019)?

  6. #6
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    I'm going to order TurboCad Deluxe ($150) for compatibility with my previous designs with earlier versions.

    Has anyone seen the following cheap ($7) software from Athens?

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/3D-CAD-Mech....c100005.m1851

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    Paul, that's probably a free program they are selling. They also have a listing for Blender, which is free software. I wouldn't trust them. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Blender-3D-...4AAOSwj0NUdKu-

    Edit: Looks like FreeCAD https://www.filehorse.com/download-f...2/screenshots/
    Last edited by pinstripe; 04-15-2019 at 06:27 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    I'm going to order TurboCad Deluxe ($150) for compatibility with my previous designs with earlier versions.

    Has anyone seen the following cheap ($7) software from Athens?

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/3D-CAD-Mech....c100005.m1851
    In my opinion, it is wasted effort using anything less than an industry standard package. Fusion360 qualifies as industry standard, is free and is as powerful as the super expensive packages. How many online tutorials do you see for these cottage industry CAD packages? There is no shortage for Fusion and others. Also, if you know Fusion, then you nearly know Solidworks, Inventor, etc. All the parametric modeling packages use the same techniques and have the same features.
    Lets not forget that Fusion is made by the same people that make Autocad and Inventor.
    I get it that people are afraid of the "cloud", customers are afraid of it, etc. But if John from NYC CNC can use it for his business with confidence, it shouldn't be a concern.
    I don't know what a hacker is going to do with one of my models of a live steam locomotive or some 3d printed bracket for an R/C airplane anyhow... It's not like any of us are making parts for a DOD contract that gets used on a F35 or submarine, and if we were, we could afford Inventor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    But if John from NYC CNC can use it for his business with confidence, it shouldn't be a concern.
    While I agree with your sentiments about "cottage industry CAD packages", keep in mind that John makes money from Fusion 360 training. Maybe more money than he makes from manufacturing. I have nothing against him or what he does for a living, but I wouldn't base my decision off his excitement for the product.

    Fusion 360 does appear to be excellent, but there are some questions about the licensing model. The Solid Edge license is much clearer. Free for hobbyists, never expires, no internet connection needed. I haven't seen anything from Autodesk committing to the free license (maybe they have, but I haven't seen it). Look at the current process for renewing the free license https://knowledge.autodesk.com/suppo...usion-360.html

    "See if you qualify for free use" buried at the bottom of the window under the big "Buy Now" button. Doesn't look like they are very keen on people seeing the free option.

    I have nothing against paying for software, I make my living from software. What I'm not keen on is the uncertainty about the product and the licensing. The Software As a Service model locks customers in much tighter than perpetual licensing. I'd much prefer if they sold it with a perpetual license like Alibre does.

  10. #10
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    I used Solid Edge every day for about 10 years. It was a good program, the equal of SolidWorks which I use now. Only reason for the switch is that SolidWorks so dominates market in the East that getting help that has experience was impossible.

    Fusion 360 looks to be very good. My problem with Fusion is it is an Autodesk product and I don’t trust them at all. I think they will pull their usual crap once they have enough users of Fusion.

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