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Thread: Tools You Didn't Think You Would Use Much, but You Were Wrong

  1. #51
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    Aug 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim The Grim View Post
    This was for pulling pins from the molds.

    I could have really used that yesterday. Thanks for the idea.

  2. #52
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    Jun 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
    Fein Multimaster, ......
    The Multimaster for sure! Bought mine hoping it would help scrape some old tile adhesive from a concrete floor. Didn't do so well for that, but I use it frequently for other jobs that would be nearly impossible otherwise. Cutting copper tubing inside a wall cavity where a normal tube cutter can't swing. Cutting a pvc drain pipe in the same situation. Today I needed to cut some protruding nails flush with the 2by4. Just reach up and notch them with the Multimaster, grab with pliers and bend back and they snap right off at the notch.

    Great for cutting electrical box holes in sheetrock, too.

    What a timesaver, if not job saver.

  3. #53
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    Jul 2006
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    I ended up with a small, cheap, old Ryobi 6V cordless drill when someone gave me a box of random tools they were getting rid of. I have several very nice drills both corded and cordless so i figured this would get passed on to someone else or tossed. I set it on my bench and found that I was grabbing it all the time for quick light duty stuff like deburring holes, non-critical countersinks, spotting small pilot holes, running screws in and out of stuff. It's really small, lightweight and stays out of the way when not in use. It plugs into a wall wart charger (no removable pack) so there is no separate charger to deal with, the cord just hangs at the end of the bench and I plug in when it gets low. I'd typically consider such a thing almost a near-useless toy but found myself using it all the time.

    Another was one of those extension cords the rolls up in a spring loaded reel. Another freebie that on a whim, I mounted over my bench. I use it all the time. It was handy enough that when I spotted a similar thing with a drop light on CL for a few bucks I bought it, took off the drop light and put a receptacle on the end. I mounted that one right next to the overhead door going outside, super handy when working on the cars or whatever.

  4. #54
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    Dec 2016
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    Helsinki, Finland, Europe
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    Quote Originally Posted by platypus2020 View Post
    damn iPad spell check, and my stupidity to check the final results

    op corrected
    And I was thinking that it's some really weird slang name for mystery tool!

  5. #55
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    Jan 2013
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    Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by john hobdeclipe View Post
    The Multimaster for sure! Bought mine hoping it would help scrape some old tile adhesive from a concrete floor. Didn't do so well for that
    I am a little surprised. Someone on another forum strongly recommended a vibrating tool to remove old caulk when re-sealing one piece aluminum box trailer roofs. He suggested forming a blade for the task (sharp but slightly dulled to not gash). It's a pretty nasty job on a large trailer, so I was looking forward to this improvement.

    Why do you suppose it did not work well? I'd guess the tile adhesive is really hard, where the caulk tends to be somewhat softer.

  6. #56
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    Oct 2002
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    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanganes View Post
    ..........Another was one of those extension cords the rolls up in a spring loaded reel. Another freebie that on a whim, I mounted over my bench. I use it all the time. It was handy enough that when I spotted a similar thing with a drop light on CL for a few bucks I bought it, took off the drop light and put a receptacle on the end. I mounted that one right next to the overhead door going outside, super handy when working on the cars or whatever.
    A friend had two or three of those in a garage he used to have. He hung them from the ceiling next to the incandescent lights and plugged them into one of these adapters. The garage was poorly built and had few outlets so that was his workaround and it really was very user friendly. If I were building a new garage I would incorporate several ceiling mounted receptacles just so I could hang a few of those around it if I wanted.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    In the desert
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcane View Post
    A friend had two or three of those in a garage he used to have. He hung them from the ceiling next to the incandescent lights and plugged them into one of these adapters. The garage was poorly built and had few outlets so that was his workaround and it really was very user friendly. If I were building a new garage I would incorporate several ceiling mounted receptacles just so I could hang a few of those around it if I wanted.
    Nice thing about most modern new construction garages is they already have a couple ceiling outlets for the garage door openers.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    SE Texas
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    I have one of those HF 3 x 36 belt and disk sanders. I bought it several years ago for some wood projects and was not completely happy with it. It didn't seem to have much power and the belt or disk would easily stop.

    There are many videos on it on the internet (Youtube) and one of the things that almost all of them mention is the belt tension. Sure enough, not only was my belt not properly tensioned, but the motor was actually cocked at an angle. It is surprising how much better it worked when I set the tension properly. Not it is difficult to apply enough pressure while sanding to stall it. The motor, while not great, really was not that weak.

    Tensioning the belt on this sander is a difficult job. There is no nice way to apply the proper tension while holding the motor at the right angle and tightening the bolts. I am presently making a proper tensioning adjustment for it. Like most Asian machines, it is a DIY kit. I also purchased one of those link belts to see if it would decrease the vibration. I will add that when the tensioning adjuster is complete.



    Quote Originally Posted by Bob La Londe View Post
    Yeah, the little 1x30 HF belt sander has turned out to be a frequent flyer in my shop. The 4x36 (or whatever length it is) goes on the other list. I bought it because the 1x30 was so handy, but the bigger one needs more motor so I never use it. I don't think its even plugged in. I think I am going to move it from the bench to the shelf next to the oscillating drum sander (which I do sometimes use) this afternoon.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Victoria BC, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanganes View Post
    ... I bought it, took off the drop light and put a receptacle on the end...
    After taping some magnets to a bunch of stupid-cheap LED flashlights, I almost never use my drop light... except when I want power, because it has a couple receptacles molded into the handle. Never occurred to me to just cut the useless light off and wire a real receptacle on the end. It would be way better. Actually, I've 2 of them (one salvaged from an old vacuum that I wired a drop light to). I might do both.

    Thanks for the idea.

    Oh, another one for me... stupid-cheap LED flashlights. They're awesome. I took some and taped a magnet over a little wedge of wood. Instant work-light for whatever, pointed exactly where I need it. I made a bunch and just stuck them to various machines. A bunch of other flat ones, and one I even taped on an old hasp-hinge that I mashed into being stiff. I can point that one anywhere. They're good for working under a car as well, as I can just stick them and aim as desired, yet they're small enough that they don't get in the way. I've even stuck them to the side of a screwdriver and wrench.

    Way better than drop lights, especially the old ones that had incandescent bulbs... remember those? Dang those got hot, always had to be right in the way so the light would get where it was useful. The smell of burning flesh... Kids these days have no idea how good they've got it.

    David...
    Last edited by fixerdave; 05-16-2019 at 09:32 PM.

  10. #60
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    Jun 2005
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    Almost Dallas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    I am a little surprised. Someone on another forum strongly recommended a vibrating tool to remove old caulk when re-sealing one piece aluminum box trailer roofs. He suggested forming a blade for the task (sharp but slightly dulled to not gash). It's a pretty nasty job on a large trailer, so I was looking forward to this improvement.

    Why do you suppose it did not work well? I'd guess the tile adhesive is really hard, where the caulk tends to be somewhat softer.
    I think this kind of scraping is a job for a reciprocating blade, not an oscillating blade. I can put a modified chisel tool on my SDS Plus hammer drill and it will pick the tile and old vinyl flooring (40 plus years old) off the floor quite easily and quickly. But even that leaves a glue residue.

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