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Thread: Newbie looking for knurling info

  1. #11
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    May 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yondering View Post
    FYI, that is a clamp type, not a scissors type tool. They are different things, although some here continue to use the names interchangeably. The scissors type is more robust and applies more clamping force easier.

    OK, but LMS calls it a Scissors Knurling Tool. So what's the difference between the two?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils4ever View Post
    OK, but LMS calls it a Scissors Knurling Tool. So what's the difference between the two?
    Both crap and limited in use, why have to constantly set the things for the job in hand when can go straight in with a normal knurling tool.
    Also never ever seen a decent knurl done by either, even the best would end up my scrap bin

  3. #13
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    May 2019
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    So, assuming I get the tool set properly, do I use the power feed or do I manually turn the cranks to do the knurling?

    It seems I would have to greatly increase the feed rate it I wanted to use the power feed.

  4. #14
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    May 2018
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    SE MI USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils4ever View Post
    OK, but LMS calls it a Scissors Knurling Tool. So what's the difference between the two?
    Below is a scissor-type knurling tool; the hinge is between the knurls and the clamping screw. This allows more force to be applied to the knurls, at the cost of more force taken by the hinge. If the hinge is midway between the knurl and clamp screw, the knurls see the same force exerted by the clamp screw but the hinge is subjected to twice that force.



    Below is a clamp-type knurling tool; the clamping screw is between the knurls and the hinge. Not as much force is applied to the knurls as in the scissor type, but the hinge also takes less force. If the clamping screw is midway between the knurl and the hinge, both the knurls and the hinge see half the force applied by the clamping screw.


  5. #15
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    Dec 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils4ever View Post
    So, assuming I get the tool set properly, do I use the power feed or do I manually turn the cranks to do the knurling?

    It seems I would have to greatly increase the feed rate it I wanted to use the power feed.
    Hand feed is just fine. The knurls turn so they follow any speed you use.

    For steel you will want to apply pressure (a fair amount) that makes it move and hold that pressure. As the knurls do their work the carriage will move in response to your pressure against the knurls pounding away room to move ahead. For aluminium and brass I can't really feel that same "clearing" so I just move the handwheel smoothly and at a rate of roughly 4 turns of the work for each width of the knurl for travel.... might be more like 5 or 6 turns for each width of travel.... Needless to say this means low spindle speeds.

    At least that's how I've done it and generally I get some nice clean knurls and coinings.

    As for the styles DrMike pointed it out well.

    I only recently "graduated" to my own scissors style tool. Up to now I'd used the straight push tools. Likely still will for coining. Something to keep in mind is that a good way to use both the clamp and scissors tools isn't to set them right over the center and screw down the nut. Instead set the tool so they won't go over the top of the part you're making by the depth of the knurl and a bit more. Basically in most cases set up the wheels so they contact the part at 7 and 11 o'clock. Then you push the cross slide onto the part and the knurl you start is complete and ready to be fed on by the time the knurl wheels are at roughly 6:30 and 11:30.

    The wedging action this produces puts some but very light bending loads on the part. But it makes it far, far easier to engage and disengage the tool at the ends of the knurling operation. You simply move the cross slide in and out like with a push tool. But with only about a tenth or less of the force needed due to the wedging action. Play with it on some scrap and see what I mean. Also doing it this way means you are not trying to use some manner of tool or get your fingers in close to the spinning chuck. So far safer all around.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by hareng View Post
    Both crap and limited in use, why have to constantly set the things for the job in hand when can go straight in with a normal knurling tool.
    Also never ever seen a decent knurl done by either, even the best would end up my scrap bin
    That's fine if you have a large and heavy machine. The OP is using a small 7x16 mini lathe. So a lot less harm and better chance of success using a clamp or scissors style.

    The cheap import scissor style I have was so loose and sloppy in so many ways when I got it that I'd agree with you though. I didn't even bother to try it before I rebuilt and tuned it so the arms would only move in only the one plane. I've only done a couple of parts with it since it got back together but it did a lovely job with clean sharp knurls. The only downside is that the wheels are a different size from my other wheels so I need to further modify the tool or buy other wheels to fit. But the tools themselves if nicely made can do a nice job.

  7. #17
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    A lot of the cheap tools like these respond to some fine tuning to tighten them up. Not economical for the professional, but fine for anyone who has a little patience.

  8. #18
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    Feb 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by old mart View Post
    A lot of the cheap tools like these respond to some fine tuning to tighten them up. Not economical for the professional, but fine for anyone who has a little patience.
    Yes, that's my experience too. My scissor tool needed a bit of fine tuning when I got it but then worked well for a lot of knurling. I finally destroyed one of the wheels (chipped the teeth of that one, but not the other, weird) and replaced them with quality wheels from McMaster, so it works even better now.

  9. #19
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    Sep 2015
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    My only knurling experience is with bump type knurls. With the AXA and BXA types it is difficult to get both knurls to bear on the work equally. My preference is the old Armstrong and and similar tools with a swivel head. I have never tried knurling on a mini lathe but I suspect using a bump type knurl on them would be pretty rough on the bearings. I am wanting to try a scissors tool but am not satisfied with the quality of most or the price of Eagle Rock. I am planning to build something along the lines of Hemingway's kit. I have their drawings but have to modify them because the knurls I have are too wide for the Hemingway.

  10. #20
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    Oct 2013
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    As detailed in one of the links I posted, I made my own clamp type knurling tool, and it worked OK, but it's not pretty and it needs more work. However, it was an interesting project and only cost a few dollars worth of materials I already had.









    http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/tool...minum_4937.AVI

    http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/tool...minum_4938.AVI

    http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/tool...minum_4939.AVI

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