Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Static Balancer

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    1,443

    Default

    Here's another method, called whipstaff balancing. Old school, works great.
    https://books.google.com/books?id=vy...ancing&f=false

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Kirkland, Washington
    Posts
    1,516

    Default

    Thanks for all the ideas. These are small steel flywheels so it shouldn't require a huge device. I would hope the teacher would show some commercial applications for balancing rotating devices.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    490

    Default

    If you go the hard drive route(which is a great idea!) make sure you use older drives with aluminum platters. Many newer drives have what appear to be glass platters.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    5,392

    Default

    For small things like these will be you want very low friction. The style of design posted by MattiJ is likely the finest basic design other than knife edges as shown by Mcguyver. But without the need to be precisely leveled like plain knife edges require.

    And the repurposed hard drives that use the discs and bearings is FREAKING BRILLIANT ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Very low friction bearings with very precisely balanced and made discs. If you can scrounge up four old hard drives you won't beat that for quick and easy ! ! ! ! !

    Of course all of these options require very round and straight shafts with cones that precisely center the flywheels.

    If the flywheels won't be TOO heavy another option would be a magnetically suspended shaft. I use a prop balancer for my model airplane props that uses this method. Of course once again the shaft must be very straight and conical ends very accurately centered. But it does work VERY well. The shaft is magnetically suspended between two strong magnets that are spaced about .005 to .01 further apart than the length of the shaft. One end sticks, but not very strongly so the friction is very low. And the other end sits in mid air suspended magnetically. And with modern rare earth magnets I suspect that flywheels up to around 6 to 8 oz could be easily held.

    If you try this to aid with more magnetic force the ends could be mostly square across the face with just a small fairly broad angle conical pip in the middle. that way the magnets would be closer to the face and provide more support.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Kirkland, Washington
    Posts
    1,516

    Default

    BC the magnetic balancer sounds like a lot of fun to build. This will be used in a classroom and might need to be more rigid to survive.

    As I need another project like Custer needed more Indians, the teacher involved will be in charge of finding me some hard drive discs.

    thanks for the input.
    Pete

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland, Europe
    Posts
    3,404

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by andywander View Post
    If you go the hard drive route(which is a great idea!) make sure you use older drives with aluminum platters. Many newer drives have what appear to be glass platters.
    I'd actually prefer the glass platters, no need to worry about wear or dents.
    And the ones that I have broke took some effort to break, so I wouldn't overly worry about breaking them. It's not like that you can do percussive shaft straightening on the rollers even if you have aluminum platters.. at least not without bummering your bearings.

    One user was asking more details and pics of the "hdd balancer":
    Sorry, not my project, just some cool idea that I remember seeing elsewhere and thought that its worth mention.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Rugby, Warwickshire, England
    Posts
    1,006

    Default

    I wish I'd see the picture of the 'HDD balancer' before I built my one. I've got a large collection of HDDs waiting to be converted into magnets and aluminium ingots.


  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Sunny So Cal
    Posts
    4,859

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    bearings, spindles, disks and frames all re-purposed:
    Now that is nice. And Im sure we all have some hard drive parts and hard drives that are toast. Thanks for the idea. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •