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Thread: filing machines

  1. #1
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    Default filing machines

    Been looking at a few of these. Most are single-ended, as in the file is held at one end only. I did see one which held both ends of the file- much like a hacksaw frame where the frame is the thing that is driven up and down, riding in bushings of some kind. Seems like that would make for a more rigid and accurate holding of the file, and perhaps adds a little more precision to the machine.

    Having the file (or blade if you use anything that a hacksaw frame would hold) ahead of the bushings should help keep the filings out of the bushings.

    One drawback of course is that now you have a limited depth of throat to deal with.

    Does this idea resonate with anybody?
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  2. #2
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    I don't remember seeing a filer with a frame going up and down, but there are filers with a back support for the file. Mine has one, and I mistakenly thought I'd use the support much more often.

    Personally, I'd avoid a machine that limits the throat depth significantly. I assume it will also limit your choice of files. And this is even more important considering the very scarce supply of any of them.
    Last edited by MichaelP; 05-21-2019 at 08:46 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by darryl View Post
    Been looking at a few of these. Most are single-ended, as in the file is held at one end only. I did see one which held both ends of the file- much like a hacksaw frame where the frame is the thing that is driven up and down, riding in bushings of some kind. Seems like that would make for a more rigid and accurate holding of the file, and perhaps adds a little more precision to the machine.

    Having the file (or blade if you use anything that a hacksaw frame would hold) ahead of the bushings should help keep the filings out of the bushings.

    One drawback of course is that now you have a limited depth of throat to deal with.

    Does this idea resonate with anybody?
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=efI1kdhtjOM This is the model I have which fits your description. Adjustable speeds and quite ridgid. Have never seen a modern version.

  4. #4
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    many had the over arm, mine does. It has a roller to back the file and a foot to hold the work down - worth having as there is a heck of a pinch hazard between work and table.

    Main thing is how many files does it come with? I spent 3x what the filer cost go get a good cache of them
    .

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    many had the over arm, mine does. It has a roller to back the file and a foot to hold the work down - worth having as there is a heck of a pinch hazard between work and table.

    Main thing is how many files does it come with? I spent 3x what the filer cost go get a good cache of them
    Yeah, I have the same one. And the same issue, buying the files (proper die filer files) was expensive. JR-

    Last edited by JRouche; 05-21-2019 at 08:38 PM.
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  6. #6
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    Based on Darryl's description, I visualized a hacksaw-type frame moving up and down. And that's what I've never seen.

    My Milwaukee filer has two overarms. One is the support described by Mcgyver. Another one is designed to hold the upper end of saws or 8"-long flat files (3 3/4" files need no upper support). The overarm with a slider looks somewhat similar to the one shown in the video. I rarely employ it since I, mostly, use round or triangular files. Maybe I should make some adapter sleeves/collets for them...
    Last edited by MichaelP; 05-21-2019 at 08:46 PM.

  7. #7
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    Yeah, I had a milwaukee with the same two overarms. Got rid of it once I bought an Oliver. The roller was OK, but the plunger movement had slop, and it did not always force straight up and down movement.

    The Oliver has a spring loaded slider. That works very well when you want to have a surface square to the table. You can. by the way, clamp a piece of hacksaw blade in the slider type overarm, and use it for cutting. Goes pretty fast, and takes any width of blade, so it can do what a jigsaw does.

    I was able to buy about 40 files, some new, some I will need to send to one of the chemical process sharpeners. When sharp files are used, they can really shape metal quickly, it does not take very long to remove a very respectable amount.

    Last edited by J Tiers; 05-21-2019 at 11:26 PM.
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  8. #8
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    I have a Harvey Butterfly Filer that I don't use often but it can do things that nothing else can,it has the Overarm support with spring loaded dovetail slide that works well.The files are pricey like others have said.

  9. #9
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    I expect those files would have to be straight, as well as being sharp- many of the flat files I have are not actually flat, and I suspect this has to do with the method of quenching. In any event it's not an issue for hand filing, but in a machine it could give a less than optimum result. I suppose that in part at least, that's one reason for the fairly short stroke on the filing machines that I've seen.

    Holding the file from both ends should allow you to use a longer stroke with less deflection of the file, and a sufficient and effective framework for the sliding 'hacksaw' should keep a pretty good accuracy. Maybe there is already a machine that would do as I'm thinking- a shaper in some other form?
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  10. #10
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    The stroke is fixed there. You can only change the speed (or frequency if you will).

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