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Thread: OT? dunno - have you tried to re-arch a leaf spring at home?

  1. #31
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    Jan 2005
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    Buffalo NY
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    Man, if I could only find a mechanical engineer to consult on this.
    Hmmm.

    -D
    DZER

  2. #32
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    Jan 2003
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    In case nobody has mentioned...reversing the eye (re-arcing) on a leaf spring was a common way of lowering pre-1949 Fords. They had a traverse leaf spring in the front and back. Re-arcing the spring was a free way (free except your labor) to lower the car by the diameter of the spring eye. Usually it was done with a sledge hammer over wood blocks since most guys didn't have access to hydraulic presses.

    Those early Ford springs were thinner than the ones in the first post, so might be a bit more effort.

    It doesn't have to be a dangerous situation, the spring could be controlled by light cable through the eyes to prevent it jumping around out of control.


    The spring in the first post seems to have lost its arch mostly near the center hole, that implies to me it was way overloaded at some point.

  3. #33
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    Oct 2005
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    British Columbia
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    Quote Originally Posted by metalmagpie View Post
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    Anyway, the video in my original post shows a pro spring shop mechanically re-arching a spring and then preparing to reassemble it and return it to the customer with no mention whatever of heat treating. This is a pro spring shop, and the springs they send out have to work or they would be subject to litigation.

    I'm going to try what Andy did above. I'm betting I can get my spring leaves to pretty dang close to the right shape.

    metalmagpie
    I've been in a lot of spring and suspension shops over the years and what I saw was exactly what your video shows pertaining to re-arching leaf springs.

    I'm betting you can do it too. It's not your first day in the shop and I think you know what to look for.
    It does take experience and technique to get quick repeatable results, that's the advantage the guys at the spring shops will have.

    You're not under the gun to do it fast, take your time, you'll get there.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  4. #34
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    Oct 2002
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    Kirkland, Washington
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    All done. It was easy, but took 2-3 hours. I got better at it as I went along.

    Here is a shot of the first (shortest) leaf being re-arched on my press. As you can see from the ton gauge, six tons is all this one needed at a time. The most I needed was 9 tons; the least was 3. Not super heavy pressing. Not scary in the least. Nobody got hurt.



    In the next picture, I have shown the re-arched leaf lying directly on top of the matching leaf. The idea is to try to show how the re-arched leaf now has a curve that closely approximates that of the other one. You can see the marks I left.



    Here are the assembled springs ready for their next job. These are from a 6000 pound axle so the springs are nice and strong. Anyway, I now know a whole lot more than I did before I started, and the whole thing didn't cost me much except some grief.

    metalmagpie


  5. #35
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    Apr 2017
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    Kelowna BC
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    Oooh man I am scared spitless of a cast V block under a press ram..
    .. ever since the tech at Kamloops Harley Davidson told me what happened to his thumb straightening fork tubes..using a cast iron V block that let go..
    Last edited by 754; 05-30-2019 at 02:09 AM.

  6. #36
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    san jose, ca. usa
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    awesome

  7. #37
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    Oct 2008
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    MO
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    It worked just like it should have.
    Good job.

    THANX RICH
    People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

  8. #38
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    Dec 2016
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    Engineers tend to over complicate when a mechanic/technician just makes it work.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobinOK View Post
    Engineers tend to over complicate when a mechanic/technician just makes it work.
    Yes - but what about if the mechanic/technician is also a retired engineer. YEOWWWW!

  10. #40
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    Aug 2018
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    Tai Tokerau - NZ
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    everyone loves a happy ending.

    I am surprised at how little force they took though.

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