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Thread: Turning B&S 9 to R8 question

  1. #21
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    Even just looking around at options for your B&S socket to use for a rub test I found quite a bit of B&S 9 items are out there. Much of it is even new or NOS. So it may not be as tough as you think to gather up what you need. And it's not like you need more than one or two of each item. Between making a few of the items yourself and buying others I'll bet you'd have all you need in fairly short order.

  2. #22
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    Dec 2018
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    I've decided not to attempt a 'conversion' to R8.
    The jury is still out on making a whole new spindle, or, gather up BS9 tooling.
    Since I already have a 6x26 knee mill, I would like to share tooling with the little horiz.
    I got a NOS big mill cutter on the way, with that I can start some test tapers and see how it goes.
    Don't really want to offset the tailstock for this, it's a pita to get back. But if I do, I want to make a production run of blank shanks that could be finished out later with straight cuts.

  3. #23
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    Now wanting to share the tooling is by far the best reason for making a second spindle I've seen so far in this thread.

    Do you have the new mill yet? Or any idea of the size of the shaft?

  4. #24
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    Dec 2018
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    and....resale value, it seems that when you see machines for sale with B&S tapers, they are automatically viewed as old, beat-up, out-dated junk, with non-existing tooling.
    But, when you see a R8 machine people look closer.

    The new (new to me) machine isnt here yet. I should finish up new house flooring & paint before I make a partisan move like another project in the garage.
    The purchase deal is closed though. flooring should be done this week, and get machine next week (and make room in garage)
    a new spindle would take a piece of stock 1.750x15" and that will fill up my lathe (Logan) completely.
    drilling the drawbolt hole would need to be done on my longer/lighter lathe.

  5. #25
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    Jan 2005
    Location
    Buffalo NY
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    I need to get my ID spindle setup on my Brown & Sharpe #13
    and grind some of these spindles for you guys.
    I have a few mill spindles to regrind myself, Morse #2 in my case.
    For my #13 I have 2 steady rests, I figure I can hold the quills
    with the bearings and spindles together, and grind the taper in
    context. I need to get a sine bar made up that can be held
    in between centers, to better set the taper angle. I will keep you
    posted.

    --Doozer
    DZER

  6. #26
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    Dec 2018
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    Wells-Index is now priced at $600 for a R8 re-do job.
    If you can beat that price you might find a market segment.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ringo View Post
    Wells-Index is now priced at $600 for a R8 re-do job.
    If you can beat that price you might find a market segment.
    I guess we all have our own price point. But for myself doing all this strictly as a non paying hobby that puts such a plan of action fairly far down the list of options.... But then I've done my own MT3 tapers some time back and made my own 5C collet chuck for the lathe. What I learned along the way takes a bit of the concern away over having a go at it myself.

  8. #28
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    Dec 2018
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    Cool,
    I would like to see the thread where you make the 5C collet chuck.

    and, what you mean by the last sentence,? I missed that.
    "What I learned along the way takes a bit of the concern away over having a go at it myself."??

  9. #29
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    Ringo, my collet chuck was a LONG running project from well before I joined up here on HSM. So there's no build thread as such. However I did ask in either my own thread or on another thread about collet accuracy since in testing the collets for central I got some wildly mixed results. I posted the picture below on that thread but because I'm not able to use the right keywords I can't find it at this point.

    Here's a picture of the final project items. The collet chuck itself that screws onto the threaded nose of my lathe, the drawbar that inserts through the tail end of the spindle and a "G" wrench I made for tightening the drawbar. This was about a year and a half ago and I've used it on roughly a dozen occasions since that time.



    I did have pictures of my MT3 arbors I made from raw stock but they fell victim to the Great Photobucket Phiasco about a year ago. I've got them on a loose hard drive but I need to hook up the USB chasis and "save" them from the drive yet.

    What I learned was that it's OK to machine the tapers to a decent degree of accuracy to start with. And then it's just fine to use a lathe file a truly flat sharpening stone or finer sandpaper backed with a bit of shim stock to smooth and slightly alter the taper. The trick is to just "top off" the peaks left by the machining. As long as you are just topping off crests without getting down to the roots of the machining grooves then they will tend to self center. But if more than a "kiss" of this sort is needed then you need to go back to machining.

    What the file work, stoning or very fine abrasive work gives you is a lot of flat "plateaus" that line up and give the taper effectively the same slipperiness as a ground taper. It won't look as nice but it'll function the same. For example the MT3 tapers I made and tuned up with care when bumped home with literally one finger and a light tap took easily 6 to 10 times the bump to break loose. A result that was on par with commercially ground finish arbors.

    Now the first one to reach that point did not come quickly. But I learned and tested and came up with a method and after that the others I made took a fraction of the time.

    A big factor in my success was having a taper socket I could use to test my machined tapers. I'd tune a bit and then mark the taper with three or four strokes of a felt marker along the length. Then I'd very lightly place the commercial socket onto my taper and give it a twist to rub away the felt marker. I'd then file or sand the bands away that made contact and re-mark and test rub again. When I got wear marks on the felt marker lines somewhat equally along the whole length I knew I was there. And that was the point where I got the taper to lock then break loose at a ratio of bump in to break free on par with the commercial stuff... and in a couple of cases my own tapers were even a little better. Such is the quality control of cheap import stuff.

    I hope this aids and inspires you to have a go.

    EDIT- If you're wondering why the protruded collet chuck design it's because my lathe is one that has a gap bed insert. So the bed rails do not extend all the way in to the headstock. The length of my chuck design keeps the carriage far enough from the head stock that it never extends out past the end of the bed rails by more than a small amount
    Last edited by BCRider; 05-30-2019 at 01:51 AM.

  10. #30
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    Dec 2018
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    That's very cool.
    Tell me about that. You say it is a threaded nose, but the lathes I'm familiar with threaded nose would only have about 3/4" spindle bore. your drawbar looks much bigger than a threaded nose spindle bore.??
    Do you have a 1 1/2" spindle bore with a threaded nose? are you using some kind of threaded bushing on the collet ID?
    I have 1 1/2-8 nose with a 5C collet chuck and it takes up lot of bed length, it is really too big.

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