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Thread: Computer Issue Boot Disc OT

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    I copied all the files I wanted to save, word docs, pictures, PDF's etc. Are those files going to be lost?? or is this just for safe keeping?
    I will have find smart tools and install it.
    There is always a significant chance you will lose the drive contents under these circumstances - whether due to a hardware problem, user error when doing the boot fix, tool issue, or bad luck. Plus it has already been flakey in some way.

    Added to that - Windows is a lousy data recovery platform. It likes to write to devices, even when it is important that no writes occur (like right now). Any writes to a compromised device can cause further damage.With linux you can easily mount the device "read only", etc.

    You can get the smart tools from the link I posted - that's the original source. Once you extract the health info from the drive (find a tutorial online, it's really easy) it will provide insight into the potential reliability going forward, and how you may want to use the SSD in the future.

    My local computer repair place said they had issues connecting to the drive. I don't seem to have any. Maybe they had a flaky interface.
    I have less than zero tolerance for those excuses from a repair place.

    I can see all my desktop files, C drive etc. It looks a little different than when the drive was running the show, but I realize I'm just reading the files off of it and that the computer isn't booted off of it.
    That is encouraging. It is possible there are errors on the disk that impact the ability to boot windows, but it otherwise looks good. You could have malware on the drive, malware could have damaged the boot record.

    In this situation my first step is looking at the SMART health. Next steps depend on that.

  2. #62
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    OK, thanks. I will download the program later tonight. Should we continue here or should I p.m. you ?

    Hopefully someone else can benefit from this to.

    JL.....

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    You have already copied everything off of it, right? That is step 1.

    Second, install smartmontools on your computer. Use it to get the drive health info for the drive, and then post the results.

    It is sorta sounding like your local computer repair place ignored an easy fix.

    https://www.smartmontools.org/
    OK, Which one do I download?? The confusion is starting already !


    Table of Contents

    1. Install precompiled package
      1. Install the Windows package
      2. Install the OSX/Darwin package

    2. Install from the source tarball
    3. Install latest unreleased code from SVN repository
    4. Update the drive database
    5. Run smartmontools from Live-system



    JL................

  4. #64
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    As suggested, I would NOT be using windows to do this. That's like trying to dig your way out of a hole.
    If you can see the files, Copy them to a safe place. Then it doesn't matter if the drive is accidentally trashed (though it's usually recoverable)

    This experience should convince you the value of backups.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    So who wants to be the first to walk me through fixing the boot sector issue??
    As I said before, I would do a CLEAN INSTALL - zero out the drive, format it, and start again. If you really want to recover the previous install:
    fixmbr.
    https://www.tomshardware.com/news/wi...mbr,10036.html
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    I copied all the files I wanted to save, word docs, pictures, PDF's etc. Are those files going to be lost?? or is this just for safe keeping?
    Safe keeping. Backups. backups. backups. This really cannot be stressed enough if your data has any value whatever.

    My local computer repair place said they had issues connecting to the drive. I don't seem to have any. Maybe they had a flaky interface.
    You got ripped. Very little is unrecoverable. If that is the case then they aren't a "computer repair place" at all and infact a "hard drive sales place" I would be mightily annoyed. But bygones, move forward.

    Re smartmontools - if you are doing this from Windows, you would download the Windows Package.
    I do not think this will provide any useful information, since, if you can see the drive (especially from Windows), there isn't really a problem. It may warn you of pre-fail states, but every drive is in a pre-fail state from the day it's made.

    Again, if you aren't doing a clean install (Which, again, I recommend) Then whatever else you do, I would do a non-destructive run with the linux tool "badblocks".

    I would be surpised if fixmbr didn't work.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    There is always a significant chance you will lose the drive contents under these circumstances - whether due to a hardware problem, user error when doing the boot fix, tool issue, or bad luck. Plus it has already been flakey in some way.
    I would disagree, except there's always a chance you'll lose the data on any given day, I wouldn't call recovery a "significant" risk to data.

    Added to that - Windows is a lousy data recovery platform. It likes to write to devices, even when it is important that no writes occur (like right now). Any writes to a compromised device can cause further damage.With linux you can easily mount the device "read only", etc.
    This is very pertinent. If windows can't read a drive (ie, the filesystem is one of the 20 or so that aren't NT or FAT) it will say "there is no file system, i want to format it just for me because i don't play nicely with others"
    My usual process for recovery would be to image the entire drive to a file using linux tool "dd" then work on the image. This case IS NOT THAT BAD.

    That is encouraging. It is possible there are errors on the disk that impact the ability to boot windows, but it otherwise looks good. You could have malware on the drive, malware could have damaged the boot record.
    Or more likely, windows broke itself.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    Added to that - Windows is a lousy data recovery platform. It likes to write to devices, even when it is important that no writes occur (like right now). Any writes to a compromised device can cause further damage.With linux you can easily mount the device "read only", etc.
    diskpart lets you mount read-only volumes in Windows.


    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    OK, Which one do I download?? The confusion is starting already !
    Welcome to "free" software You will want the precompiled Windows one unless you want to spend a couple of weeks learning how to compile and build software.


    Quote Originally Posted by mihit View Post
    This experience should convince you the value of backups.
    Definitely. If you had a recent disk image, you wouldn't need to do any of this. Just restore from the disk image and maybe restore your data after that. About an hour and you would be back in business. Solving problems like this can be very time consuming. Macrium Reflect and SyncBack were mentioned earlier in this thread. Both are very good at different things, and I recommend them both. If you only want to use one, get Reflect because it will let you restore the whole system quickly.


    Quote Originally Posted by mihit View Post
    Or more likely, windows broke itself.
    Most likely. I don't think there will be much wrong with the disk.


    Unless someone here has solved the exact same problem (I haven't), then we are all going to point you in different directions based on our past experiences. There are most likely several different ways to solve this problem, and you may need to try several different things before you find one that works. You may also give up and just reinstall Windows before you find a solution. I recommend that you google the error code 0xc000000f. There are several guides and plenty of other threads from people that have solved this exact same issue. Work through them as they are known solutions to the problem.

    Avoid installing any new software that promises to fix this problem. It might, but it might also do more harm than good. Ask here first and we can tell you if it looks legit.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    That's what I did, last restore point, then I got the boot error.
    Anyway...it's up and running with a new drive. I have a USB to SATA interface coming. and will follow the advice that some of you guys posted. We'll see. This is uncharted territory for me so it will be interesting.

    JL.....
    BTW, the "restore points" are not the same as backups.

    A backup is ideally an image, a straight copy of the disk as it was at the point the backup was made. If you need to replace the disk, you put in the new one, use a boot system*, and run the disk restore program, using the image as the source and C as the destination. That puts everything back where it was before, and you should not really be able to tell the difference between the old and new disk.

    I do not trust most data backup systems. The only one I liked is SyncToy 2.1, but it does not seem to work with any OS past Win 7. With SyncToy, you can set the thing to "contribute", which never erases anything, it just adds anything it does not find on the destination drive. Some that promise to "synchronize" your disks will end up erasing data if the source does not have it, and the destination does, which is exactly what "synchronizing" should do. So you can get in bad trouble with them.

    I need to find a new backup program that works like SyncToy does.

    * Another way is to use a disk interface system (typically they use USB connection) connected to a different computer that has the image program on it, and run the program, again using the image disk as the source and the new disk as the destination. That is a better way, in my opinion.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 06-11-2019 at 07:14 PM.
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  8. #68
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    I downloaded the smart tools program. I can't figure out how to get it to scan the drive.
    I tried to run the drive health but got nowhere with it.

    JL..............

  9. #69
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    If you already have a new or rebuilt computer running to your liking, and you have the important data backed up somewhere, I would suggest simply reformatting the drive, which should identify and isolate any bad sectors, and then use it as an external data storage drive, or maybe a system drive in another machine. A 480 GB SSD is only about $60, so it's not worth messing around with unless you enjoy the challenge, or are very frugal.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinstripe View Post
    Unless someone here has solved the exact same problem (I haven't), then we are all going to point you in different directions based on our past experiences.
    The problem is Windows. I solved it in about 1994.

    Their system, ergo the solutions, haven't changed much since then, either.

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