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Thread: scrounge of uncertain composition

  1. #1
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    Default scrounge of uncertain composition

    My grandson, (the weldor,) brought me a bunch of threaded rod, all one inch, in various lengths from 7" to 24." It is used where he works to bolt cranes to truck bodies. so is definitely NOT Home Hardware threaded rod. There are two different types, with codes CD6B and B31F. One of them is apparently supplied by Fastenall, the other,who knows?
    Can anyone here shed a little more light on this stuff? It is 1"-13 according to my thread gauges, and machines beautifully.
    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

  2. #2
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    Default

    I checked my stash and they are stamped B7 which I think is grade 8.My 1" is 12 TPI NF and 14 TPI is NS.

  3. #3
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    B7 is roughly equivalent to grade 5.

  4. #4
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    Are you sure they're not metric?

    Standard 1" threads are either 8, 12 or 14 TPI, not 13.

    M25 has a diameter of fractionally less than one inch, and a standard coarse pitch of 2mm, which means there are 12.7TPI—easily mistaken for 13 on the usual short thread gauge.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Burch View Post
    Are you sure they're not metric?

    Standard 1" threads are either 8, 12 or 14 TPI, not 13.

    M25 has a diameter of fractionally less than one inch, and a standard coarse pitch of 2mm, which means there are 12.7TPI—easily mistaken for 13 on the usual short thread gauge.
    Mike,
    Don't confuse the North Americans - M25 is an oddball, not used as far as I know. Let's stick with M24 x3

  6. #6
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    You can usually tell a lot about the quality of steel just by cutting a bit off by hand with a hacksaw.

  7. #7
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    Why not have your son ask what the material spec is? He works there, right?
    It could be manufactured to Canadian standards, SAE standards, ASTM standards, ISO standards, or a host of others. Guessing isn't going to help.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter S View Post
    Mike,
    Don't confuse the North Americans - M25 is an oddball, not used as far as I know. Let's stick with M24 x3
    Doesn't matter -- we're already confuzzled. And I *live* on the Canadian border.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    Doesn't matter -- we're already confuzzled. And I *live* on the Canadian border.
    plus you have to put up with the french influence

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    He said it machines beautifully - so Im pretty sure you can rule out the cheap low grade stuff, it's most likely hardened good quality material as the cheap all-thread is gummy to machine and work with, it would rather tear than cut.

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