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Thread: The second best way to fasten handwheels to the leadscrew

  1. #1
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    Default The second best way to fasten handwheels to the leadscrew

    Several of the HSM magazines from the late 90’s had articles by D.E Johnson called “Mill Drill Adventures” that have been very helpful in my own mill drill adventure.

    So... I have finally gotten around to installing sealed bearings in the housings for the handwheels and I am ready for the next step. Which is installing a new handwheel and tri-ball handle.

    The article suggests broaching a keyway, and since I don’t have a broach what is the best way to fasten the handles to the leadscrew? I was thinking of drilling and tapping the handle and threading the leadscrew and then using a jam nut. What do you guys think? Any better way?

  2. #2
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    Hi
    A dimple drilled into the lead screw the same diameter as the fixing grub screw with a jam nut will hold it firm. Drill and tap the end of the lead screw. Use thick washer with an O.D. big enough to jam the boss of the handle to the inner race of the bearing. You may need spacer collars to make it fit.

  3. #3
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    You can do the "lathe as shaper" method of cutting a keyway, using a boring bar and a piece of HSS as the cutter.

    You can pin the handle on, by cross drilling for a pin, maybe reaming for a taper pin. A roll pin will work too, as will a straight knurled pin.

    You can put the handwheel in position and drill then tap a hole in the end of the shaft at the junction of the shaft and the handwheel, finally screwing in a setscrew as a "dutch key".

    There are probably a half dozen more possible ways.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 06-02-2019 at 01:41 AM.
    1601

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  4. #4
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    I would broach it in the lathe or mill as Jerry describes. Spindle not rotating and tool manually fed into the work. It only sounds difficult and adds a nice capability to the repertoire
    .

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darrp View Post

    The article suggests broaching a keyway, and since I don’t have a broach what is the best way to fasten the handles to the leadscrew? I was thinking of drilling and tapping the handle and threading the leadscrew and then using a jam nut. What do you guys think? Any better way?

    Now this is an area for po pholk splines, if at the end of the shaft you can just stand up the shaft and handle at the same time and just use a regular endmill, use a little locktite on the pieces and let sit, go three plunges and insert dowels 120 degree's apart, it's going nowhere,,, it's actually not the second best method - it's superior to a single key,

    if its further on the shaft you can still do the shaft separate with a ball end mill and then plunge the handle, walla, po pholk splines,,, been using them for many years now;


  6. #6
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    I used KISS method: Locktite

  7. #7
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    Some loctite is that good - he probably would never have a problem - till it comes time for disassembly, as long as he has a good puller that will not break the handle...

    I do like being able to just slip stuff apart to for disassembly or to get to other things, and if he does not have a drilled and tapped hole in the end of the shaft he would have to do that with the Po P. splines,

    I had to cut some the other day and used loctite on them to hold the two pieces while cutting - it was high strength stuff, holy crap when I went to get them back apart I can attest to what your saying, who knows after years and being subjected to oils and such but I overdid it - it was a bear to get them back apart...
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 06-02-2019 at 09:42 AM.

  8. #8
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    I've always just used the sawzall or hack saw to cut a slot in bores.
    Andy

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    Andy have you ever doubled up or tripled hacksaw blades? like running two on the sides forward and one in the middle backwards to cut a fairly wide swath all at once?

    not exactly precision but can get you by in some applications...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by velocette View Post
    Hi
    A dimple drilled into the lead screw the same diameter as the fixing grub screw with a jam nut will hold it firm. Drill and tap the end of the lead screw. Use thick washer with an O.D. big enough to jam the boss of the handle to the inner race of the bearing. You may need spacer collars to make it fit.
    That's how the cross slide on my 11x36 lathe is held on.


    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    You can do the "lathe as shaper" method of cutting a keyway, using a boring bar and a piece of HSS as the cutter.
    I might try to give this a shot.



    I should have mentioned that the ID of the bearing that I used is 15mm.
    ....And that the original handwheels were held on with a cross pin that was hand drilled by a nice Taiwanese gentleman who eyeballed the center of the shaft.

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