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Thread: The second best way to fasten handwheels to the leadscrew

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    Andy have you ever doubled up or tripled hacksaw blades? like running two on the sides forward and one in the middle backwards to cut a fairly wide swath all at once?

    not exactly precision but can get you by in some applications...


    I haven't but sounds like something to give a try!

    I cut this slot with the sawzall. I think I cleaned it up with a file.

    Andy

  2. #12
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    May 2006
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    Wow - that's impressive, it's amazing what you can do with simple tools when taking your time and keeping a close eye on things, good work.

  3. #13
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    Jul 2001
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    Green Bay, WI
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    I use my shaper for most shaping/broaching work, or the Bridgeport Quill
    For lathe work..... if necessary.... I use a tool that fits my Aloris Tool Post.
    A friend gave me plans a few years ago and this is the result.
    Prior to the tool, I used the Lathe Carriage Handwheel which I think would be faster than a leadscrew wheel, even though
    I like leadscrew handwheels ( don't have one)
    Anyway a tool like this prevents further wear to the lathe and is very fast to use.
    Rich



  4. #14
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    I'm going to go back to your statement of using a sealed bearing for the lead screw. Sealed bearings are cheap- but they don't have any way of taking out axial play unless you use two of them and some method of pre-loading. Better might be to use needle thrust bearings. Cheap enough also, and still two required, and pre-load also- but will take up less space and would be the preferred method.

    If the handle is in any way required to be part of the pre-load adjustment, which is not uncommon, you may have to re-think how it can be mounted. If the handle needs to carry the division wheel, you'll want it to be able to slide on the lead screw shaft, but have virtually no rotational play relative to the shaft. I like the three pin method for this- better than a single key.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  5. #15
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    Jul 2002
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    Cross drill and use a roll pin. I have also used the jam nut and the set scre and dimple method. Aii sucessfully.

  6. #16
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    Jan 2004
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    Missouri
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darrp View Post
    .......

    ....And that the original handwheels were held on with a cross pin that was hand drilled by a nice Taiwanese gentleman who eyeballed the center of the shaft.
    So you set up the shaft in the mill (good) ordrillpress (not as good), clamping it in position so that a drill or a pin the right size goes cleanly through the shaft hole when in the chuck or collet. Now put the handwheel on, without moving anything. Clamp the handwheel enough that it will not spin or slide off, and drill through with the right size drill. The hole should be right where it is needed.

    You need to spit drill first, and baby the drill through so it does not wander, but it works, I've done it a time or two. Someone wrote it up in more detail recently, can't recall where, maybe here, maybe in one of the magazines.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  7. #17
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    Edmonton Alberta
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    All the Handwheels on my Wadkin were cross drilled with a tapered hole to allow for taper pin,Shafts were 1".

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by darryl View Post
    I'm going to go back to your statement of using a sealed bearing for the lead screw. Sealed bearings are cheap- but they don't have any way of taking out axial play unless you use two of them and some method of pre-loading. .
    Consider double row angular contact bearings. They come as a unit, all you have to do is contain then on the shaft and in the housing, no preload to work out, and you've got axial and radial loads taken care of with no backlash
    .

  9. #19
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    I used angular ball bearings in my cross slide screw. One on each side of the original bushing and use a nut and keyway to add preload.
    Andy

  10. #20
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    May 2006
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    Makes sense - when i first got my mill I set things up to have about .003" of backlash on both the X and Y as I could not get any better than that without the lead screw dragging so knew it must have just been typical bearing play,

    all these years and I have not done an adjustment because the Y only has .004" and the X .005" now, not to shabby but if I ever go to replace bearings I might seek out some angular contact... would be nice to eliminate it all just for more stable climb cutting...

    the reason my my leads are doing so well is because I made a little gearbox out of the lead screw mounts, it really was quite easy, I had to take the mill apart to get it in the basement anyways and noticed they had a line going to the leads from the quick lube pump, but it would just wizz on the leads and then drain down and out the crude fitting lead cap mounts, I installed O-rings and sealed a few things here and there, the only way out is when the level exceeds the lead threads and it has to run out through there, they are continuously bathed in vactra #2...

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