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Thread: TIG cooler pump motor making noise

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    I would seriously try this or at least check to see if the motor has developed some bearing play, all that's needed is a little play to start rattling things around, was this a slow development ? or did you fire it up one day and it was noisy?

    if the former then it might be bearing slop or just so dry it needs a little extra cushion of 90 wt
    It's a cheap little GE 1/3hp motor. But it does have a rigid base. There are stickers on it that say it has ball bearings that are lubricated for life. Here is a picture of the carbonator assembly.



    Your slow development question is a good one. But I can't answer. I bought the thing used from a Chinese restaurant in a neighboring city. I am certainly capable of tearing down the motor and changing out the bearings, or even balancing the rotor. Maybe I'll have a go at that.

    metalmagpie

  2. #12
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    yup the motors got bell housing bolts so id go into it and have a look around... at least it looks serviceable and that's certainly a good thing.

    I'll add something else, since you have no history, if a motor is assembled wrong it can make allot of noise also - not just crooked end caps but ones that are not rotated into proper positioning (brushed motors) as it can raise hell with the electrical "timing" and make noise in doing so as the motor fights itself,

    sometimes on brushed motors iv kept the bell caps loose enough to rotate and dialed in the motor while actually running it...

    have no idea what kind of motor you have.
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 06-06-2019 at 10:53 AM.

  3. #13
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    I would be astonished if it weren't a common-as-dirt shaded pole motor. I'll tear into it and post back. I appreciate the wisdom, thank you all.

    metalmagpie

  4. #14
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    anytime i see the words "lifetime bearings" it still means that the motors life can end when the bearings do,,,

    it's like the auto manufactures claim that the tranny never needs a fluid change as it has "lifetime fluid"

    Wow - everything I ever learned about fluid wearing out and also collecting particulates is null and void, the fluid will outlast the transmission, forget about the fact that the life of the trans is directly connected to the fluids quality...

  5. #15
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    Here is what the teardown revealed. First of all, the label lies like a rug. The bearings are plain bronze (brass?) sleeve bearings with oil grooves inside and wicking foam (felt?) on the outside. I worked some 30 weight non-detergent in there and put it back together. Is it quieter? Maybe.

    I'm thinking the problem is wear in the sleeve bearings, which don't look replaceable. :-(

    metalmagpie

  6. #16
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    just plain might be out of balance too since you don't have any history on it maybe has always been...

    were the bearings dry and loose?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    just plain might be out of balance too since you don't have any history on it maybe has always been...

    were the bearings dry and loose?
    The big end bearing is "shielded" inside some sheet metal, have to do surgery to see it at all. The other bearing you can see but only after you remove the rotor. So I can't comment on looseness, but from what I could see they were bone dry. The rear one had a proper oil hole. I put several drops of oil in, saturating the oil retaining fabric whatever that is. The other end I stood up and applied about a tablespoon of oil, figuring some of it would make it past the sheet metal. I believe it did, since oil appeared on the far side after a bit. I wiped up all the excess and reassembled.

    Certainly I could take the rotor to the balance shop and have it professionally balanced. That would almost certainly work. It would also cost as much as a whole new carbonator. This is definitely use-and-throw-away manufacturing.

    metalmagpie

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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by metalmagpie View Post

    Certainly I could take the rotor to the balance shop and have it professionally balanced. That would almost certainly work. It would also cost as much as a whole new carbonator. This is definitely use-and-throw-away manufacturing.

    metalmagpie
    in that case I would just insulate the crap out of it - let it "shake and bake" lol

  10. #20
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    I cut out some bits of 1/2" rubber and mocked up a soft mount for the motor. On it, it runs the pump nice and quiet. So now I just have to make a real soft mount and I will be back in business.

    metalmagpie

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