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Thread: OT: Ladder lift or hoist for shingles or other items

  1. #11
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    The shortest and fastest path to success is to read (or watch) and follow the directions.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIyjECFK4Uc

    Since your guy is a beginner I would strongly suggest slipping a small piece of plywood under the shingles when cutting so he doesn't cut all the way through the felt.

    Steve
    Last edited by SteveF; 06-09-2019 at 02:31 PM.

  2. #12
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    I'll have him watch some videos when he comes by around 4:00 PM:


    (GAF video on membrane or felt installation on hips)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bQPEEtWGKU (Fairly complete drip edge and shingle install)

    I have read conflicting opinions on where and how to install the drip edges. Some say install it directly on the sheathing, some say install over the roofing felt, and some say it depends on whether it is an eave end or gable end. The hip roof has all eaves.
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 06-09-2019 at 03:10 PM.

  3. #13
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    If you're going to need more than 16' of ladder, i.e., if you'll need to extend your ladder, you'll need someway to handle the transition from 1 section to the other. When I made mine, I made a little ramp-like piece for each rail.

  4. #14
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    Success!


    Video clips:

    http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/hous..._Lift_5410.AVI (Lifting one bundle using cordless drill)

    http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/hous...I(Transferring bundle to roof)

    The battery ran out of juice after a couple lift cycles, so I used the corded drill to complete the job:

    http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/hous..._Lift_5412.AVI (returning unloaded dolly to ground)

    http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/house/Tibbs_5413.AVI (Bonus video of Mr Tibbs)

  5. #15
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    I have read conflicting opinions on where and how to install the drip edges. Some say install it directly on the sheathing, some say install over the roofing felt, and some say it depends on whether it is an eave end or gable end. The hip roof has all eaves.


    No point in putting it over the felt; water making it to the felt now seeps beneath. My favorite - nail the drip edge to the sheathing, then ice and water shield all over and onto the drip edge. Then the felt really doesn't matter.

    When you put the felt over the drip edge, use one of the many fine roofing adhesives rated for felt like Rainbuster 700 to spot glue it ever foot or two. On the gable ends run a thin bead the entire length.

    In your picture above the flashing on the sidewall should go OVER the roof SHINGLES (I miss-typed this as felt due to Sunday beers ) . Again, to keep the water on the correct side.
    Last edited by lakeside53; 06-10-2019 at 12:19 AM.

  6. #16
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    I like drip edge over the felt as well, then ice barrier, then shingles.
    Andy

  7. #17
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    From what I have read and seen, the flashing should go on last, over the shingles, and the edge on the wall should go under the siding (which is actually pretty easy to pry loose and then fasten down. On the sloped part of the roof where it meets the wall, small pieces of flashing (step flashing) should be fitted and interlocked almost like the shingles in a valley.

    Of course, roofing cement can be used to correct any minor mistakes. We have found some errors done by the previous roofer, such as having the drip edge installed upside down.

    Some links to consider going ahead:

    https://inspectapedia.com/roof/Wall_Flashing_Leaks.php

    http://www.roofkey.com/roof-to-wall-intersections.html



    http://www.roofkey.com/roof-to-wall-flashing.html


    https://homeguides.sfgate.com/instal...ing-21255.html

    https://www.vaughtroofing.com/installing-step-flashing/


    I think whatever I do, the roof will be much better than what it was before, and if it lasts 20 years, I'll be 90 and it won't matter. However, I may need to have the main roof replaced (or just recovered) in 5-10 years or so, and I'll probably contract a professional roofer, who can also correct any problems with this job.

    The email I got from a professional roofer in January:


    Hi Paul,
    Very sorry for the delay getting this information to you. Timing with the holidays was tough and we were shut down and now I have been trying to play catch up. Here is some general info/pricing/timing regarding the various projects we discussed.

    1. Tree repair- the repair to the damaged corner would involve the following steps:
      1. Setting up a safe work environment
      2. Removing damaged wood trim and roofing as needed
      3. Carpentry repairs to the deck/soffit/trim with touch up painting as needed
      4. Installing new ice shield and synthetic felt membrane where damaged roofing was removed.
      5. Installing new eave/rake metal to match existing
      6. Installing new shingles to match existing as closely as possible
      7. Cleaning and hauling away all debris.
      8. Total cost: $2,450.00


    Can you remind me about the gutter? Did a gutter get torn down here and does it need to get re-installed?


    1. The small flat roof as shown in the first photo attached is a little difficult. My suggestion would be to replace this corner of the roof from the hip to the side edge (triangle). I would not re-frame to create slope but simply install a proper membrane system with shingles on the upslope and continuos ice shield below. This would make more sense and be water tight for 30 years. The tricky part is tieing into the existing roof because it’s in poor condition. My suggestion, for a proper job, would be to replace the entire front side porch so everything goes together as it should. Cost for replacing just the corner section (non-warranted connection) would be $2300.

    Cost to replace entire front porch would be $4800.


    1. Backside flat roof replacement is suggested. Easiest solution would be to eliminate the existing openings. Cost to install a new membrane roof with carpentry repairs to close the openings would be $3400 dollars.

    Sorry again for the delay getting this info to you. Please call or email me with questions regarding the specifications or pricing above.
    Happy New Year and I’ll talk to you soon!
    Jimmy

  8. #18
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    All you have to remember is water flows downhill and you want to keep it on top. Gable ends in high wind areas might need more attention, like bead sealant etc, to stop the wind from forcing it in places it shouldn't go. Step flashing is where I use stick down ice and water shield and a sealant bead.
    Last edited by lakeside53; 06-10-2019 at 12:21 AM.

  9. #19
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    Redoing the shingles on 1/2 my garage this spring, I backed my truck with the shingles in the bed (it's got a flatbed) up next to the garage, screwed some 12' 2x6's together so they were parallel, with about 1' of space between them, and leaned them up at a steep angle from the deck of the flatbed to the roof. I put a rope on a hand truck, my brother would put a bundle on the hand truck and push it up the ramp, while I pulled it up using the rope. It went reasonably ok for the amount we had to do (just over 20 bundles). If I had more to get up on the roof, I probably would have looked for a more efficient/less effort method of doing it.

    The roof itself wasn't made particularly well, so the bundles definitely had to spread out over the roof, rather than stacked over a few spots.

  10. #20
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    Paul, that's a great idea, but what happens when the dolly has to run off to the other section of the ladder? if you have to go that far.
    You still have to pull the weight up, unless you rig some sort of winch, manual crank etc.
    By the time you do all that you could split the bundles and carry them up in smaller quantities.

    This must be roofing season, I'm in the process of pouring a cap on my chimney and then getting the roof done. 44 squares.

    JL...............

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