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Thread: A Blast from the Past--Radial Engine

  1. #11
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    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
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    BCRider--I like your posts. I'll tell you a dirty little secret. The first engine I ever built was a single cylinder wobbler, designed by a famous model steam engine builder Elmer Verburg. I built it and it worked so well that I used his cylinder, piston, and valve hole positions to be the basis for this radial.
    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 06-09-2019 at 02:54 PM.
    Brian Rupnow

  2. #12
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    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    My kind of thinking... Luv it...

  3. #13
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    Aug 2009
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    I was admiring some radial engines when I visited the Wright Patterson museum in Dayton OH.
    They had some that were cut away so you could see the internals.

    JL....

  4. #14
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    Dec 2018
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    Wanna figger how a radial works??
    Here you go.
    They are weird at first with the cam moving 1/8 crank speed, the odd number of cylinders, the firing order, the master rod, reciprocating rods, and all that.
    This guy did a masterful work on the radial:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qjnQKXNPsk4

  5. #15
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    Some of the radial engines were designed where the crank shaft was stationary and bolted to the fuselage. The cylinders rotated around it. I can only imaging how much work had to go into balancing the cylinders and related parts. Not sure what the advantage was.

    JL............

  6. #16
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    Mar 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    Some of the radial engines were designed where the crank shaft was stationary and bolted to the fuselage. The cylinders rotated around it. I can only imaging how much work had to go into balancing the cylinders and related parts. Not sure what the advantage was.

    JL............
    Those would be rotary engines, from WW1. Most of them had no throttle either, was controlled by Magneto's

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  7. #17
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    Anderson SC
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    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    Those would be rotary engines, from WW1. Most of them had no throttle either, was controlled by Magneto's

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
    I seen a couple flying at Wright Patterson museum off the front lawn years ago. It was during the big airshow at the airport, the museum runs events during it. Those rotary engines sound like a plane sure to crash any second ! What a wild sound ! Rev up, pop pop pop, slows to near stop then the process repeats.

    I hear that the planes only want to turn one way also, barely turning the other way, due to the gyroscopic effect of all that engine weight rotating.

    Those were the days !

  8. #18
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    Ontario, Canada
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    From what I have been told, those WWI engines caused trouble of another sort as well. As you can imagine oil liked to move away from center of the engines, and as such they were a total-loss lubrication system. When operating they would give off an air-oil mixture, which was the primary reason that aviators wore scarves - to wipe their googles and faces clean. The lubricant used was often castor oil, which is not harmful to humans but would be breathed in and consumed by the pilots while flying. Those familiar with castor oil will also recall that it also acts as a very good lubricant for the digestive system, leading to some anxious moments for the pilots who could not necessarily get to the facilities while flying and dog-fighting.

  9. #19
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    Dec 2018
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    Can we possibly get back closer to on track?
    The rotory engines of WWI were never on topic. the rotory is NOT a radial.
    the 'radial' is somewhat on topic.

  10. #20
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    Skaneateles, ny
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ringo View Post
    Can we possibly get back closer to on track?
    The rotory engines of WWI were never on topic. the rotory is NOT a radial.
    the 'radial' is somewhat on topic.
    Here then:




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