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Thread: Large End Mill for Bridgeport

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    SF East Bay.
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    6,486

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    When you select a large endmill or face mill, keep in mind that there are limits imposed by the R-8 spindle. A large mill pushed hard will require more force than the R-8 can transmit without slipping.

    I believe that my mill (1.5 HP motor) suggests no larger than a 3 inch face mill.
    From the manual:

    Drilling Capacity for Cast Iron.............................................. .................................................. ...................... 1 in.
    Drilling Capacity for Steel............................................. .................................................. .......................... 3/4 in.
    End Milling Capacity.......................................... .................................................. ........................................ 1 in.
    Face Milling Capacity.......................................... .................................................. ....................................... 3 in.

    Dan
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Appalachian Ohio
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    765

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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnl View Post
    I must be a little dyslexic. I thought this was a "Large End Mill for Breakfast" discussion.
    Many years ago I lived in Sweden and was taking Swedish classes at the local night school. One of the drills each person in the room took turns describing their breakfast. The room cracked up when I said (in Swedish) "I had a bowl of girls for breakfast"

    breakfast flakes == Flingor
    girls == Flickor

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Buffalo NY
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    4,347

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    Quote Originally Posted by wdtom44 View Post
    Sounds like a job for a shaper....
    Does not help the guy solve his problem.

    -D
    DZER

  4. #14
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    Jan 2005
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    Buffalo NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by bborr01 View Post
    Do yourself a favor and get a carbide face mill.

    Brian
    Also does not help the guy solve his problem.

    -D
    DZER

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Buffalo NY
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    I think we all agree he want too fast and
    must mind his surface speed.
    If the chips are immediately blue or purple
    you are going to fast.
    Straw or just brown, you are close to good.
    I am surprised no one mentioned the color
    of the chips as a gage to what is going on.

    -Doozer
    DZER

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Medford Oregon USA
    Posts
    131

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    No blue chips, no bad noises, just a bit of smoke from the oil and fairly light slow cuts. Yes, I goofed by not looking at the speeds. Thanks for all the feed back. I am planing on trying a 1-1/2" or 2" carbide face mill. From reading others input in old threads, I guess the TPG inserts are not the way to go. Looks like the SEHT inserts are popular now. If I could I would try to fit a shaper and a surface grinder in the garage, but there is too much stuff in there already. Maybe in a few years I can relocate and build a bigger garage.
    Last edited by donf; 06-10-2019 at 08:03 PM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Somerset UK
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    Save the nice hss cutters for finishing or aluminium and get this type for the rough jobs, the tips are easy to obtain for steel and non ferrous.
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2-inch-R8...27e811408d2126

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    5,361

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    This is also a job where a lot of us like to use a flycutter. The cutting tip can then be either HSS or some manner of carbide. They tend to be SLOW and really point out just how good a job you did on the machine's tram as well.

    Another option sort of in between a face mill and a flycutter is to try something like vpt showed in the first couple of posts. Namely a big heavy insert face mill with less than a full complement of inserts. So the body of the face mill acts like a flywheel to power through the entry shock and the fewer cutting teeth reduces the load on the machine if it's not a full size multi HP sort of machine. Although you did mention that your mill is a Bridgeport. So perhaps this "trick" isn't needed.

    Using less than a full complement of inserts in such a cutter is also another compromise that is mostly going to apply to home guys doing this for fun instead of trying to make a buck where time is seriously money.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Springfield Mo
    Posts
    546

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    Quote Originally Posted by donf View Post
    No blue chips, no bad noises, just a bit of smoke from the oil and fairly light slow cuts. Yes, I goofed by not looking at the speeds. Thanks for all the feed back. I am planing on trying a 1-1/2" or 2" carbide face mill. From reading others input in old threads, I guess the TPG inserts are not the way to go. Looks like the SEHT inserts are popular now. If I could I would try to fit a shaper and a surface grinder in the garage, but there is too much stuff in there already. Maybe in a few years I can relocate and build a bigger garage.
    The SEHT inserts are really pretty awesome. Ive got a Shars 2 inch one that uses those inserts, I use it in my little mini-mill for finishing cuts with aluminium a specific inserts. Razor sharp cutting edges, leaves a beautiful finish even in steel. Touch brittle, but the reduction in cut pressure more than makes up for it.

    And on the topic of oil I saw a rather interesting point made a while back; motor oils are formulated to interfere with metal-to-metal contact, to prevent wear. Kinda makes sense that it wouldn't be the best to use when trying to use metal to cut metal. I've started using dark pipe threading oil for my cutting oil needs, can find it at Lowes and Home Depot in the plumbing section for a few bucks a bottle and it works fantastic on steel for everything I've used it for

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    441

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    Quote Originally Posted by wdtom44 View Post
    Sounds like a job for a shaper....

    Does not help the guy solve his problem.
    -D

    Doozer, You are right I didn't help him with the problem at hand except for the way he might save the end mills he smoked. However if someone was not familiar with a shaper I might have planted the idea of a shaper that might help in the future and might help save another shaper form being melted down.

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