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Thread: Vertical hit and miss engine

  1. #161
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
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    Hi Ringo--Good to hear from you. I love building these engines, but they are generally short term projects for me. About 2 1/2 to 3 months, and by that time I just want them to run so I can move on.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow

  2. #162
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    Mar 2008
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    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
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    Laying in bed last night, going over the starting procedures for this new engine, I suddenly thought "Oh my God-I may have created a monster!!" I thought I was being very clever by hiding the points and ignition cam in behind the flywheel. Bingo!! How do I adjust the position of the ignition cam to time this thing. This morning I opened the 3D cad model, and breathed a sigh of relief.--One of the grub screws in the ignition cam is accessible from the side, even with the flywheel in place. That means I can set the ignition timing, and when the engine runs satisfactorily, I can loosen the flywheel grubscrew, slide the flywheel back a bit on the shaft, tighten the second ignition cam grubscrew, then slide the flywheel back into place.
    Brian Rupnow

  3. #163
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    503

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    Brian,
    out of curiosity, have you put a degree wheel on any of your engines and noticed the ignition timing?
    Do you just set timing until it runs good?
    Do you have a magic setting to begin with?
    My uneducated guess would be about 5' BTDC?

  4. #164
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    Mar 2008
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    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
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    I build my engines in 3D cad before any metal is cut, and I know a dirty little trick. I aim for about 10 to 15 degree advance on my ignition timing. The cad lets me rotate the crankshaft until the crankshaft is about 10 to 15 degrees before top dead center, then "freeze" it. Then I measure from the open end of the cylinder to the top or bottom of the piston skirt. I then set my engine up using a vernier to give this dimension on the real engine. This gives me very accurate timing, and saves me the bother of making a degree wheel.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow

  5. #165
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
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    I didn't feel like "builder bear" today, so I went to Part Source and picked up my ignition points and condenser. I have never taken the time before to model a condenser, so when I built the engines I just mounted the condenser wherever I could find room for it. I took half an hour and modelled it, so I can put it into my engine models from now on. I have had the Dodge ignition points and the NGK CM6 sparkplug modelled for years now.
    Brian Rupnow

  6. #166
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
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    Forgot my starter hub. This one will be a little different. I made the part this afternoon from steel. You will also notice that I changed the orientation of the condenser.--This way makes the wire lead lay flatter so it isn't rubbed by the flywheel.
    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 08-12-2019 at 03:26 PM.
    Brian Rupnow

  7. #167
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    3,908

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    I've been daydreaming about your crankshaft machining dilemma in how to prevent the wobble from the machining process. I wonder if grinding to final dimensions would suffice?

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  8. #168
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    Mar 2008
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    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
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    RB211 Since I don't have any grinding machinery, it's kind of a moot point. I don't really think it would make any difference. The material moves as it relieves internal stresses, and I don't think it matters how the material is removed, the stresses still relieve themselves. Perhaps if the entire crankshaft was taken down to - .003" and then ground to finish size, it would be truer.
    Brian Rupnow

  9. #169
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    Mar 2008
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    If any of you "Newbees" ever wondered--This is the electrical wiring required for one of these engines. The condenser wire attaches to the only terminal on the ignition points. So does the blue wire, which runs out to one side of the coil which is not shown, Another wire runs from the other coil terminal back to a 12 volt battery. From the battery a wire runs thru a switch and then back to a ground anywhere on the engine. When the points open, it breakes the circuit, and this induces a spark in the sparkplug wire. If the engine runs away on you and starts to over rev, you shut the switch off.
    Brian Rupnow

  10. #170
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    Mar 2008
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    Like I said--Something a little different. The starter hub bolts to the flywheel. The starter spud fits into my 3/8" variable speed drill.
    Brian Rupnow

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