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Thread: Building a 22cal revolver

  1. #1

    Default Building a 22cal revolver

    I would like to build a 22 revolver but I am having a hard time finding a set of plans. Would any one have a set I could down load? Your help would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Wyoming
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    177

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    Are you looking to build a single action or double action revolver?

    What is your experience with guns? Because revolver designs from other cartridges can be adapted to .22's if you're willing to stick with a 6-shot capacity cylinder. If you want a 10-shot .22 revolver, then you'd have to re-work the ratchet and hand.

  3. #3

    Default

    I am not choosy on the action, however a double action would be nice. I don't have experience Building gus, but have plenty in using them and doing some repairs. I am mostly concerned with tolerances and types of steel.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Wyoming
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    177

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    OK, here's a video series on building a revolver. A young lady machinist built a single action revolver from scratch, and in a series of videos, she shows viewers the setup, machining and assembling of a revolver.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80wm9GY7IwI

    Then said young lady very generously posts a video of the drawings for her revolver:

    https://youtu.be/G6VywTnlROo

    The differences in building a DA design are in the lockwork and the need for a crane, cylinder locking mechanism, ejection rod, etc.

    Single Action revolvers are easier to build, easier to debug to get them going.

    There are some issues in building a double action revolver that aren't there in a single action. Single action revolvers are easier because the trigger does not index the cylinder - the hammer does, and only the hammer does. In a double action revolver, the trigger has to index the cylinder, cock the hammer, etc.

    Lastly, there are several different designs for double action revolvers. There's the "classic Colt" DA design, which was used on guns such as the Python, the New Service, etc. I'm going to tell you right now, if this is your first revolver build, and you've never gunsmithed a Colt DA revolver, then you should not consider the classic Colt DA revolver design.

    That leaves the S&W and Ruger designs. The S&W design uses a single leaf spring, and the Ruger design uses nothing but coil springs. You might want to build the frame, cylinder, barrel, etc and buy lock parts for your first pass. I can highly recommend Jerry Kuhnhausen's book on S&W revolvers as well.

    If, after viewing all of those videos, and you think you want to take this project on, I'm happy to answer more questions.

  5. #5

    Default

    Thank you for the information. I did watch most of her videos on the gun build, but was unable to find the plans. I didn't think it was in the actual video. Anyways thanks for sharing your knowledge.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    NE NC/SE Wisc.
    Posts
    1,276

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    If you want to build a .22 revolver, why not buy an already made revolver and just copy it? Use it as your "blue prints." Ruger, Colt and S&W all make good .22 revolvers.
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    177

    Default

    Bill, if you wanted to go BigBoy's suggestion (and it is a good suggestion if you have the funds), I could suggest going with one of the Italian-made single-action .22LR revolvers. It would probably cost you about $300.

    The Heritage Rough Riders are about half this price, but they're looser in tolerances/allowances, and you're not going to get quite as good a set of measurements. Remember, when you make drawings off an existing item, you need to look at your final drawings and think really hard about where you might have picked up some "drift" in measurements from tolerances in the original's production sizes and measurement errors.

    The other benefit of using an existing gun as a "blueprint source" is that you can take the finished pieces in your hand, out of the gun, and think hard about "how am I going to make this part?" and walk your way through the process, from raw material, to workholding, to machining, to finishing. Some people can look at a drawing and "see" the resulting part in their mind, along with the machining operations to go from raw material to part. I can do this. After working around more gunsmiths, mechanics and machinists, I realized that not everyone could do this, and giving someone even just a mock-up part made from wood or plastic allows them to suss out how to get the job done...

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