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Thread: Collet Chuck's? Closers?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Default Collet Chuck's? Closers?

    I'm leaning towards buying a 5mt to 5C collet sleave, and fabricating a draw tube and closer, but interested in those ER40 Chuck's that mount directly into my D1-4 spindle.
    Main purpose is to turn axles on model trains. Could simply just use the 4 jaw or the 3 jaw with machined softjaws. I just want very low run out and quick mounting.


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  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    I'm leaning towards buying a 5mt to 5C collet sleave, and fabricating a draw tube and closer, but interested in those ER40 Chuck's that mount directly into my D1-4 spindle.
    Main purpose is to turn axles on model trains. Could simply just use the 4 jaw or the 3 jaw with machined softjaws. I just want very low run out and quick mounting.


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    You do realize why collet chucks were invented correct?

    Speed, do you produce 50-100 model train axles per day 5 days per week 50 weeks per year? If so a collet chuck and closer can not be beat.
    If not buy a stand alone collet chuck that will fit in your 4 jaw and can be dialed in when needed, Kalamazoo makes an excellent product, http://www.penntoolco.com/kalamazoo-...yABEgK1V_D_BwE
    They are also dead length which you will not achieve with a back closer.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    403

    Default

    the more I use collets, the more I like them,
    lately I been using collets for common size drills, starter drills, etc.
    they are shorter than a chuck, less overhang, less runout.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    I'm leaning towards buying a 5mt to 5C collet sleave, and fabricating a draw tube and closer, but interested in those ER40 Chuck's that mount directly into my D1-4 spindle.
    Go the 5c route. Given the choice, split collets are better for work holding.
    .

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bented View Post
    You do realize why collet chucks were invented correct?

    Speed, do you produce 50-100 model train axles per day 5 days per week 50 weeks per year? If so a collet chuck and closer can not be beat.
    If not buy a stand alone collet chuck that will fit in your 4 jaw and can be dialed in when needed, Kalamazoo makes an excellent product, http://www.penntoolco.com/kalamazoo-...yABEgK1V_D_BwE
    They are also dead length which you will not achieve with a back closer.
    I like that way of thinking, however I plan on some rather small scale stuff and the thought of spinning my 8" 4jaw close to 4000 rpm if need be doesn't sit well, that's where the collet closer is nice.

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    Wyoming
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    I'm leaning towards buying a 5mt to 5C collet sleave, and fabricating a draw tube and closer, but interested in those ER40 Chuck's that mount directly into my D1-4 spindle.
    Collets are the bee's knees for holding small parts without having to dial them in.

    ER-40 collets range in size from 0.094 to 1.024 inches. You might find you need to hold something smaller than 0.094 - in which case, you might want to look at ER-32 collets instead (holds down to 0.020") or ER-20 collets (holds down to 0.015").

    5C collets range in size from 1/64th of an inch (or even smaller with a collet blank you drill/ream out) to 1.125". You can get 5C collet sets that take 1/8th inch steps, 1/16th steps, 1/32nd steps and 1/64th steps. You will find that your prices go up dramatically as you get into the smaller increment collet sets. I bought a Lyndex 1/32nd 5C collet set for my shop years ago, and it cost me over $600. Today, I've seen the same sort of set go for over $1K. Good quality 5C collet sets (Lyndex, Hardinge, etc) cost money.

    5C collets can provide you two things that ER-type collets cannot:

    - you can get 5C collets to work on hex, square or round parts
    - you can get "blank" 5C collets that you can drill/broach for whatever you want.

    ER-style collets give you a wider range of gripping sizes for each collet because they are a "parallel" closing style collet. The 5C is not. For 5C collets, it is important that you don't tighten them down on something too small, because you can 'spring' the collet and it won't hold the part properly.

    ER collets are primarily a tool-holding collet, whereas the 5C collet is used much more for workholding. There are 5C collet blocks which are very useful when milling a round part in a mill vise to quickly index the part over four or size side. There are 5C collet fixtures for grinders, lathes, etc. They're a good collet set to have for general manual machine shop work - but you'll spend more for a full set of 5C collets.

  7. #7
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    Go the 5c route. Given the choice, split collets are better for work holding.
    And go the direct spindle mount route, bolted to a backplate.
    5MT sleeve and you are straight away limiting options, ie no long pieces through the spindle etc.
    These days, if possible, spindle sleeve collet chucks belong on a mill only.

  8. #8
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    Alright then, how about one of these Gator chucks? Made by Fuerda?
    https://www.ajaxtoolsupply.com/ga5cadtruset1.html

  9. #9
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    Nov 2007
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    Default

    That what I'd get if it didn't already have a Royal closer.

  10. #10
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    Mar 2015
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    Itís settled then, Iíll get that chuck when I start to machine a lot of axles.


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