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Thread: Collet Chuck's? Closers?

  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    The first collet chucks (wire chucks as Cataract called them) were an outgrowth of watchmaker's
    lathes. They existed long before patents were even a thing. The were used to hold and support
    small diameter workpieces. Your assertion that they were originally invented for speed is void
    of validation.

    -Doozer
    You are kidding I suspect.

  2. #42
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    nope. I have some tiny collets with draw bar for my 1930's watchmakers lathe, and they were made way way before that.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakeside53 View Post
    nope. I have some tiny collets with draw bar for my 1930's watchmakers lathe, and they were made way way before that.
    perhaps the objection was that lathe collets predated patents. First patent 1790....no idea when collets where "a thing" . My earliest lathe is late 19th century and it came with collets, earlier than that don't know
    .

  4. #44
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    May 2015
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    I use an ER 32 on my lathe. I picked up the adapter on EBay mounted it to a backplate so itís simple and easy to mount and accurate


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bented View Post
    You are kidding I suspect.
    I think collets WERE CLEARLY invented to improve speed of "chucking" parts. No possible question about it. But I suspect it was not for the sort of "speed improvement" you are likely to be thinking of.

    The original way to "chuck" a watch part in the lathe was a "wax chuck", a recessed thin-walled part that was full of wax, which was actually often modified, and not quite like paraffin wax (a US term). The part was pushed into the softened wax, and the far end centered itself in a cone cut in the inside of the chuck, Then as the wax cooled, the part was pushed until it ran true.

    Not the fastest process imaginable, even though the "chucks" had ventilating slots in order to cool faster, and also to not heat the spindle so much. Capable of very good centering, though, and I understand some folks did then, and may still insist on using them for ultimate accuracy.

    The collet, if well made, would give good centering, and obviously was much faster than the wax chuck.

    Have a look through Goodrich "The Warchmaker's Lathe".
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  6. #46
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    Mar 2015
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    What I want from a collet is to turn down a step on one end of a train axle, pull it out of the collet, flip it around and do the same to the other end and maintain better than .0008 concentricity. I also want to use the capability of 5c collets have of using a depth stop so I can quickly make all the axles the same length. Going to order individual Hardinge collets in the sizes I need, as I need them.

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    What I want from a collet is to turn down a step on one end of a train axle, pull it out of the collet, flip it around and do the same to the other end and maintain better than .008 concentricity.
    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
    Opps, I have a modified swiss machine. She will do that. How many parts?? JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRouche View Post
    Opps, I have a modified swiss machine. She will do that. How many parts?? JR
    Well axles are just one example, thinking of a steam locomotive, there are MANY pins and shafts that need to be machined all over the place, no shortage of work for collets.
    This little gauge 1 locomotive I am resurrecting from the 1930's, I figured I'd make five of them. Simple design, material is cheap, and a lot can be done on my little cnc mill.
    Figured I would keep one, and sell the other four. That's just one idea. If I work on my back log of train projects, hundreds of shafts and pins to be machined.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
    I think you need to re-read his post. There is nothing demeaning in what he wrote, and not a hint of smugness.
    Thank you.

  10. #50
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    Anderson SC
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    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    Going to order individual Hardinge collets in the sizes I need, as I need them.

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
    Buying one at a time will get frustrating very fast. You will want a set, 1/32 step set works well for a home shop. Hardinge is nice but VERY expensive new. Just a good import set for those common everyday uses. THEN some emergency collets on hand for those unusual sizes that ALWAYS come up. You will be using collets a LOT more than you think. Ordering one for something special will always come up, say a hex for instance.

    Knowing what I know now..... one of those BIG assortments at a auction would have been the best and least expensive way. 5C collets only have a .005 gripping range, that is from nominal to .005 under size, thus why you NEVER have enough.

    Another real "nice to have" item is one of those 4" 3 jaw chucks with a 5C mount. Its a pain switching between the collet setup and chuck, one of those little 5C chucks fits the need most times.

    A collet setup will have you spoiled in no time. You will use it a LOT more than you think.

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