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Thread: Toe Jack

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    10,977

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    It's looking good....blind man on galloping horse won't notice its off centre.

    imo its a $hit bird move to come onto a build and tell how you'd have to done it, but there's an idea i got from madman Mike that's worth mentioning. The threaded end at the top, going into the jack, un-thread as far as it will go. Put a pair of vise grips on it close to the body. Hacksaw off most of it that is sticking out past the vice grip. Now, with the hacksaw, make a slot in the stub sticking out of the jack. Use a screw driver to screw in that stub to the bottom. Now drill a hole in the lifting part, insert the part you cut off into the jack and screw it all down tightly. It ties the whole together nicely.
    .

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Atascosa County, Texas
    Posts
    8,062

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    I prefer doing "non-destructive" conversions. I made an automatic transmission clutch pack tool over 20 years ago using that ring method for the jack. I still have the jack and still have the press.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Central Ms
    Posts
    1,148

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    It's looking good....blind man on galloping horse won't notice its off centre.

    imo its a $hit bird move to come onto a build and tell how you'd have to done it, but there's an idea i got from madman Mike that's worth mentioning. The threaded end at the top, going into the jack, un-thread as far as it will go. Put a pair of vise grips on it close to the body. Hacksaw off most of it that is sticking out past the vice grip. Now, with the hacksaw, make a slot in the stub sticking out of the jack. Use a screw driver to screw in that stub to the bottom. Now drill a hole in the lifting part, insert the part you cut off into the jack and screw it all down tightly. It ties the whole together nicely.
    I watched a video that may have been madman mike. Whoever it was modded the screw like that. I wanted to have the jack removable without using tools, and have it usable if I needed a jack.
    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

    Lewis Grizzard

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Edmonton Alberta
    Posts
    1,494

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    Nice job Dave!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
    Posts
    19,450

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    Looks good to me,I wouldn't sweat the ring being off a bit,long as it works,it works and that's all it needs to do.

    Me I didn't bother with the ring or fiddling with the screw.I picked up a cheap jack,set in place and welded the jack's lifting pad in place.The toe jack is only 3/4" taller than the original jack closed and doesn't weight much.If I need the thing for a bottle jack I just shove it under what I need to lift like it is and go.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Central Ms
    Posts
    1,148

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    Problem is the ring is supposed to fit around the jack's lifting pad. With it off center as it is, it sits on top of the pad and doesn't let the toe slide all the way down into the cutout in the base plate. During my feeble design process, I debated about whether to add it or not. I don't think it adds any support, and now it has become a problem. I might just cut it off and forget about it. Or not. It's main purpose is to keep the jack from flying out of the frame if something wierd were to happen.
    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

    Lewis Grizzard

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    3,438

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave C View Post
    Problem is the ring is supposed to fit around the jack's lifting pad. With it off center as it is, it sits on top of the pad and doesn't let the toe slide all the way down into the cutout in the base plate. During my feeble design process, I debated about whether to add it or not. I don't think it adds any support, and now it has become a problem. I might just cut it off and forget about it. Or not. It's main purpose is to keep the jack from flying out of the frame if something wierd were to happen.
    Cut it out, weld it back in place in the right spot. Sucks redoing some things

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Sunny So Cal
    Posts
    4,896

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    Oh Man..... I always wanted some toe jacks.I just couldn't figure how to do them. Thank you Sir!! JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Metcalfe, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,353

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave C View Post
    Problem is the ring is supposed to fit around the jack's lifting pad. With it off center as it is, it sits on top of the pad and doesn't let the toe slide all the way down into the cutout in the base plate. During my feeble design process, I debated about whether to add it or not. I don't think it adds any support, and now it has become a problem. I might just cut it off and forget about it. Or not. It's main purpose is to keep the jack from flying out of the frame if something wierd were to happen.
    The ring is a good idea. Weird does happen. Fix it.

    We'll all feel better about it and you probably will too.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    15,078

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    Yup cut it off and re-weld otherwise your putting the whole thing in a bind, it's a good build,

    I can see where something like this would come in handy but what's the main reason for having one of these? I know there's some obvious ones that Im just not able to come up with right off.

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