Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 56

Thread: .0005 Shim Stock Punching Holes

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    6,565

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    I would try sandwiching it between two pieces of thin plastic, perhaps 0.005" to 0.010" thick. Clear plastic will help getting the holes in the correct places.

    Another idea would be to print your pattern on label stock with the removable adhesive and sandwich your shim stock between two layers of it. Punch and cut to the pattern. Then soak the label stock with WD-40 until the adhesive softens and separate them.
    Paul, I like your first idea better. A pre-drilled hole in two pieces of 1/2" plastic clamped together, dowel pinned to keep the hole alignment and then go through it with a 1/2" end mill.

    JL..............

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    6,565

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post
    Well Joe there are lots of ways to do this, but first look at your work
    The ripples show that you are "drawing" the material
    To stop that you need a draw sleeve .
    There are ways to build one and here is one way for example
    Make your Punch "T" shaped and add a spring loaded sleeve.
    For example:
    Take a 4 inch rod 3/4 in Diam and turn it down to 1/2 for 3 inches
    Put a 2 inch long spring on the rod and then a bushing 1/2 ID x 2 inches long.
    When you whale on the rod top with a hammer, the spring will compress before the punch hits the target
    and the bushing will prevent "drawing" the material in and the wrinkles.
    You get the idea... sizes and lengths are custom to your design
    Just know that when the punch perforates the work piece that the spring should have some "un-sprung capacity.
    I would suggest using some hard plastic sheet as a support material under the workpiece.
    Hold the punch with vise grips if the "T" portion is short to prevent injury

    Rich
    Rich, yes, what is happening is the punch is pulling the material down in the groove that the die is making.
    Your idea of the spring and sleeve are understood but that sounds like a lot of work.

    I'll come up with something and post my results.


    JL...............

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
    Posts
    19,591

    Default

    Clamp it between two pieces of hardwood,then drill through slowly with a Bradpoint drill.It's a regular job for me,drilling Brass and Stainless shims.


    Here's a guy freehand grinding a drill,easy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XA8L4L30TyI
    Last edited by wierdscience; 07-02-2019 at 10:36 PM.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    6,565

    Default

    What I'm trying to do is fine tune this shear. I took this all apart and cleaned it up..... it was pretty clean to begin with but I wanted to go through it anyway.
    I ground the top edge of both blades. DiAcro says you normally don't have to shim the blades. It does pass the paper shear test, but paper is about .005 thick.
    I tried to shear some .001 brass shim stock and it just folded it over. I couldn't pull it out though, so I figured the gap between the blades was a little less than .001.
    I did ink the lower blade face and raised and lowered the shear a few times..... it didn't touch or rub the ink anywhere so there must be a slight gap.
    I thought I would give the .0005 shim a try. If this doesn't work than I guess I'll be cutting my brass shim stock with a straight edge and a good sharp box cutter blade.
    Maybe I'm asking for too much here.

    JL................


  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    NW Illinois USA
    Posts
    765

    Default

    Unfamiliar with your shear but is there not an adjustment available for clearance?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    6,565

    Default

    No, not on these.

    JL....

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kelowna BC
    Posts
    2,565

    Default

    Instead of punching holes, cut U shape out for the bolts.. try curved small scissors. .

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    4,012

    Default

    Photochemical Etching/Milling.................

    If it's worth it to you. I've had very small, flat stainless parts made this way. You submit photo art, they lay it out on a sheet. Pricing based on sheet size only, not on details of the pieces made.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Atascosa County, Texas
    Posts
    8,156

    Default

    I've never seen a sheer like that but guessing it's a single use design. Perhaps HVAC ducting tin or aluminum roof drain/spout stock. Do the blades come together in a scissor action or just drop-down parallel? If parallel, it's for really thin stock. Maybe even paper/cardboard.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    6,565

    Default

    Yes, the blades come together in a shearing action. The lower blade is parallel to the table, the upper blade is set at an angle from left to right.
    If they came together parallel it wouldn't be a shear, it would be a chop. The amount of force needed to cut would be off the charts.

    JL.............

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •