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Thread: Correct stone for stoning burrs?

  1. #1
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    Default Correct stone for stoning burrs?

    Just got a Starrett 98-12 level from eBay. It's in very good condition but there's a slight ding in the base. I've heard about "gently stoning down the burrs" but I'm not sure which type of stone to use for this. I've got some cheap and nasty diamond whetstones that go from "#200" to "#600" but I'm figuring that's not the right sort of thing to be taking to a machined base that I don't want to be grating up. I've also got some very old bench stones that I know very little about but I suspect they're black carborundum of some variety - one I think is fairly fine as it seems to scratch if you scrape metal across it.
    Should I be looking to get something like one of these? Tapered P400 alox slip stone
    ...or is that simply a different flavour of wrong?!

    Many thanks guys

  2. #2
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    I would think, "The flatter, the better" for that application. I have some very nice stones, but I wouldn't trust them to be that flat. Not even the brand-new Norton and Arkansas stones. If I was really concerned about it, I would tape or glue some fine emery paper onto a surface plate and do it that way. By the way, the stone you show in the ad is a good one for most things, I have a few like that which came in an odd lot.
    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 07-04-2019 at 11:16 AM.

  3. #3
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    Do NOT use a stone at all.......

    use a piece of a file that you have "dulled" on a whetstone until the tops of the teeth are flat and show a small amount of shiny surface.

    Now use that surface to "file down" the burr or "ding". It will cut anything that sticks up, but when that is gone, it will just slide harmlessly over the surface.

    A stone cannot be used with sufficient precision to only take down a bump. It always will take off a bit elsewhere as well. Maybe not very much, but why take any at all beyond what you want to remove?
    Last edited by J Tiers; 07-04-2019 at 02:00 PM. Reason: fixed fat finger typing
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  4. #4
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    I don't think flatness matters, what matters something so fine it'll knock the highs off and do about nothing to the rest of it. I use a hard Arkansas stone. After the stalagmites are knocked off, you could scrub for an hour with a hard Arkansas stone not dimensionally change things. The other handy thing is a deburring file - basically a small piece of file to which you've stoned off the tops of the teeth so that only burrs will get touched. I've done a fair bit of scraping and those are two things I do.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 07-04-2019 at 11:34 AM.
    .

  5. #5

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    I'm getting the popcorn.... bet this goes 5 pages.

  6. #6
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    Any old file? I'm just thinking that I've got some that are 40 or so years old that aren't in current use but they're likely to be less sharp than a new one - not totally blunt though.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
    I'm getting the popcorn.... bet this goes 5 pages.
    Yep,this sort of thing borders on religion
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by wierdscience View Post
    Yep,this sort of thing borders on religion
    Cripes, anything can go on for five pages here
    .

  9. #9
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    If the material is soft enough to raise a burr in the first place,then my approach is to take a small pin punch and hammer and tap the burr back down before stoning/filing.

    There are "precison bench stones" which are nothing more than a whetstone,either natural or man made that has been ground or lapped flat.You can also use a sheet of fine emery paper glued to a chunk of old plate glass.Or if you have a surface plate,just stick a sheet of emery paper down to it and de-burr away.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
    I'm getting the popcorn.... bet this goes 5 pages.
    I'll get us the beer!

    For an actual ding on most things like machine tables, vises, angle plates and such things I'll actually use a little 4oz ball peen hammer to tap the raised burr back down and only then go over it with a very fine and very flat stone. But tapping something like a machinist's level is certainly not a wise move.

    I actually do like the idea of stoning an older file and using it as Jtiers noted. And I also seem to recall reading that trick somewhere... Machinist's Beside Reader perhaps?

    It also sounds like you're in need of some very finer stones for doing such things. I find small slip stones work wonders for things like this. I've got an odd variety of hard india slip stones and stone files and a few shapes in hard arkansa or modern ceramic. Lansky makes knife sharpening kits that use small rectangular and triangular slip stones in holders. I gently removed the stones from the holders and those in fine and extra fine have proven very useful at a number of things where a fine finish with good control is needed... such as stoning faces and angles on trigger parts in firearms in conjunction with a jig to hold the part and guide the stones. But they are equally good at doing small jobs like you're talking about following

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