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Thread: Ring roller

  1. #1
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    Default Ring roller

    The older I get the worser I get at googling. I would like to make some garden hosepipe wind up attachments. I dont know the proper name. Something similer to what is used for organizing your air hoses on a roller. It would involve an inner pipe (I could use pipe or roll some flat sheet round and weld )as well as the two round sections that would contain the hose .These would also be handles to wind the hose up. Are there any decent plans for a sturdy ring roller that can do round bar up to 12mm .I cant remember but thought most of these rollers have a weak point in that they always leave a little flat piece on the ends. Is there a design that does a perfect circle or would this be impossible.
    I made a little ring roller more for cosmetic stuff a while back and nice plans were available.

  2. #2
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    The ring rollers I've seen use 3 rollers, so there's always a portion at both ends where the material doesn't contact all three rollers, resulting in that part not having the same profile as the rest of the ring (depending on the material, it may be flat, or may just be curved less).

    I've got one of the cheap 1" ring rollers, but have used it with decent results (as in, acceptable to me) making rings with flat steel up to 4" in width. After getting it to the right diameter and trimming one end, I'll weld the 2 ends together, grind the weld smooth, then run the welded spot through the ring roller a bunch of times to get it to the same curve as the rest of the ring (easy with my unit, as one end of the ring roller is open, so no disassembly is required to insert a closed ring into it).

  3. #3
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    As to terminology, what you show in the photo is a slip roll. It looks like a scaled up version of a George H Thomas design.

  4. #4
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    I've always known them as pyramid and pinch, your's is a pinch, same as I made. You won't get the flat if you reverse the metal each cycle. They other thing the pinch is good for is flattening sheets that are a little bent/banged up a bit. Squeeze the rollers and run it through in multiple directions
    .

  5. #5
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    Having the 3 x rolling points as close together as possible will reduce the flat spots.

    For rolling a ring with 12mm round bar I expect that to make the job tidy (more completely round) the ends could be welded together as the job got close to completed; then grind off the surplus weld and put it thru the roller again.

  6. #6
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    GHT's design was a pinch roll. Two rolls were in line vertically. The forming roll came in at an angle. The pinch rolls have the advantage of leaving a much smaller flat at the end of the curve than pyramid rolls.

  7. #7
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    I've always just rolled extra length and cut the misshapen ends off.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  8. #8
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    Yes its the gh design. I dont need a very long roller .Perhaps 400mm long. I wonder if grooves were put in the rollers ,would it do 12mm round and flat. Or would it be better to put roller dies outboard of the actual roller.

  9. #9
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    Jan 2003
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    Yes, there is a way to eliminate the flat.

    A customer brought an expensive piece of micro perforated stainless to be rolled into a circle. By expensive, I mean well over a thousand bucks for a piece that was roughly 8" x 8". When the guy ordered the material he specified one of the dimensions to be exactly the perimeter of the circle he needed, no allowance for the typical flats you get with a slip roll. He had been all over town, nobody wanted to touch the job. Perforated material is worse than solid to roll so that further complicated things.

    I accepted the job being pretty sure I could do it, but no guarantee.

    I did it on my Di Acro 12" slip roll machine. It took about a minute to complete using an idea I had seen in an old text using only two rolls of the machine.

    The way was to put as thick as possible sheet of relatively hard urethane (80A durometer) under his piece and roll. The urethane forces the material to wrap the upper roll. You keep rolling and adjusting roll spacing until the ends come together in a perfect circle. Most slip can't do this since the two rolls won't spread apart far enough to accomodate the urethane under the work piece (the Di Acro's will).
    Last edited by DR; 07-06-2019 at 05:59 AM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    ...
    I made a little ring roller more for cosmetic stuff a while back and nice plans were available.
    ...
    Wait a minute ... how does that handle/crank work?

    Sometimes it takes a 2nd or 3rd or more looks for the 3-D version to "click" in my head, but I just can't see this one. As many times as I've looked at it, I just see the handle as 2 pieces, offset by the width of the handle.
    EDIT:
    Never mind - I just "saw" it. Now I'm wondering how I didn't see it.
    Last edited by Bob Engelhardt; 07-06-2019 at 08:28 AM.

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