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Thread: Comfort Tools, not really OT

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Toronto Ontario Canada
    Posts
    823

    Default I am working in another long deceased fellow.s shop.

    I only ever met the fellow once, briefly, some 35 yrs or more ago when he demonstrated starting early gas engines at the Ontario Science Centre to a group of local model engineers.
    I am now attached to his daughter , live in what was his home, what remained of his shop at home has been integrated with the tools I brought with me.
    I do not have his mikes and verniers, they went to a nephew, but I have lots of other tools and material that were in the shop.
    Maybe it sounds strange, but at times I feel he is watching over me and encouraging me to do the very best I know how, especially when using tools which were his.
    Regards to all, David Powell.
    ,

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kelowna BC
    Posts
    2,467

    Default

    In 72 I bought my first tools. A 6 point MAC metric socket set , 6 mm thru 19mm. I have lost 1 or 2 due to lending out and they replaced with one's that don't quite look right, or feel right. My buddy Rick lost the 12mmm replaced it with a different one, which is annoying, but it often makes me think of him as I use it.. he passed away a decade ago..
    At the time I got it I was 15, could not afford the ratchet, so I used a sliding breaker bar for a few years .

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    365

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    ... But it will not last long. Not like the old heavy plug
    in drill. ...
    Quite right. But lasting long is not all that it's cracked up to be. In 1956 I got a Black & Decker 3/8" aluminum body drill (that was when B&D meant something). It still works as new & I still have it, but only as a keepsake. It is single speed and not reversible. It's obsolete.

    I had some nice Makita NiCad drills. I threw them away long before they were worn out because they were obsoleted by lithium ion. I expect that my lithium ion tools will be obsoleted before they wear out, even if the wearing out is much faster than it used to be.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Canton, Ga
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Ah memories. In the service being trained as a fire control mechanic (B52) and having reached the point of being allowed
    a class a pass, weekends were spent anywhere off base. Denver was very interesting to a young person interested in
    mechanical things, one of which were railroads. I found the local hobby shop was on the way to Union Station and a good
    place to hang out. Mil pay was very little at that time and bus fare and food used most of it up. However a nice little 3" General
    fixed beam square just had to go with me in my journey thru life. I still have and use it to this day some 60 years on.
    I have my Dads B&D aluminum pistol drill still works fine. I'll never forget the time I first used it about 1957. I was attempting my
    first drilled hole in metal. Dad came up behind me and said push it. Don't baby it. To this day that is unforgettable advice.
    Ah memories.
    RichD
    Last edited by livesteam; 07-06-2019 at 11:00 PM.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chilliwack, B.C.
    Posts
    11,752

    Default

    I have a lot of my dads tools now, and when I pick one up to use I think of where it came from, and the circumstances of it's acquision. Dad had a lot of drill bits, taps, brace and bits, hand powered drills, pliers- all of this stuff was of good quality. It feels good to use something that works well, is accurately made, and feels solid. That's what makes me smile, and also makes me recall the tools that dad had that I ruined- the marking gauge which I used as a hammer, the pliers that I left in the driveway and didn't find til spring, the tape measure where I 'fixed' the loose end-

    I learned a lot from my dad, and I'll smile when I use a technique that he taught me. That's a tool too, the ways and means of how to do something.

    Aside from that, as far as an actual tool that just feels good to have in your hand- it has to be the old Brown and Sharp micrometer.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Somerset UK
    Posts
    2,346

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    Not exactly a tool, but I bought my Casio digital watch in 1979, that's 40 years ago. Its the one with the marlin on the front and the five year battery. As I write this, the watch is 1 second slow since being reset when the clocks went forward. When the light is right, a crack can be seen bisecting the face from right to left and my name is deeply engraved on the back making it valueless to anyone else.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    UK, near London
    Posts
    1,242

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    Ah yes, my B&D drill bought about 50 years ago and in almost weekly use for the last 30 with a wire cup brush in place of chuck with low overhang that I wore down to 1/8 in. Last year I finally found a new in box replacement brush, even better though cost over twice what I originally paid for the drill. I also found a plastic body version being given away as nobody wants a single speed/direction mains drill.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Somerset UK
    Posts
    2,346

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    I would check the state of the wiring on any pre double insulated tools before continuing to use them. I had a new B&D D720 back in the late sixties, and happened to take the side cover off the handle about 20 years later and was shocked to find that the insulation was rock hard and crumbling. It got binned straight away.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    10,990

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    Most of what is being talked about are memories triggered by an object, which is all fine and good....but its the memories not the object that counts and are the source of the comfort. I have a few tools I guess that trigger those positive memories, but sans a memory, just the actual tools themselves, what gives me comfort is the joy and pleasure of using the right high quality tool for the task at hand while basking in the warm glow of knowing I didn't have to pay too much for them. Better still is using ones I consider high quality that I made myself
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 07-08-2019 at 09:50 AM.
    .

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Buffalo NY
    Posts
    4,431

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    I like your comments Mcgyver.
    Funny thing is, many folks here feel just the opposite,

    What gives them comfort is the joy and pleasure of using the
    wrong low quality tool for the task at hand while basking in the
    warm glow of knowing they didn't have to pay too much for them.



    --Doozer
    DZER

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