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Thread: How do you move a 10ee?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    Buffalo NY
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    I have had great luck using a local towing service that has roll-backs.
    They delivered my 9000 pound boring mill and my 7000 pound jig borer
    without any issues. Charged me about $200 each time.

    -Doozer
    DZER

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    N.J.
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Bulliss View Post
    I used a tow service that had a truck with a boom to unload both my lathe and mill. Only cost $60. Not sure if they are able to do 3000 lbs., though; my lathe and mill are about 1500 each.
    Or find a local wreck service with a rollback truck. Other option is a rent a drop deck trailer from a place like Sunbelt Rentals. Might need to rent skates as well.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    San Antonio TX, USA
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    the drop deck trailer would be great for DIY, depending on how far over the tow rating of your minivan you're willing to go. The smallest drop deck that Sunbelt has, which should fit a 10ee, is around 1500lb empty from memory and you'll also need a 2" hitch. Add 3000lb to that and you'll be pulling 4500lb minimum. I pulled ~3000lb with my Outback when I picked up my 6x26, a drill press and an HF 4x6 saw, and it was ok, but wouldn't want to go higher.

    But get the 10ee though, that'd be such an awesome lathe to have. What are the details on the drive? That seems to be the main reason to run closer or run away from what I've read.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    durban s africa
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    Isnt that like a ridiculous price for an awesome lathe.?I soppose if its missing everything then its not so attractive.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    789

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    yes - we have moved a bunch of cnc equipment with roll backs... Also - a normal tow truck works great for something like that lathe... (if the service thinks out of a box..) don't remember what we had hauled on the back of a tow truck... might have been the monarch...

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Germany
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    I think you can move that with one of your work vehicles1 Back a Boeing 757 up to it and haul it off. When you fly over your house just drop it in the driveway. Bob's your uncle!
    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Chester, NH
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    5,513

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    Where's it located? I'll tell ya what: if you win the auction, I'll reimburse you and move it into my shop. How's that sound?

    3000 lbs isn't really that heavy. If you don't hire a roll back wrecker, then you may want to rent a pickup truck and trailer. It's hard finding rental companies that offer trucks with hitches, but I know Enterprise does for it's corporate customers. You can do the rest of the move using nothing but a few hydraulic jacks, pipe rollers and a come-along. Figure spending about $200-$250 on jacks, pipe, chain, come-along, maybe some wood to make skids, etc.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Buffalo NY USA
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    3k lbs is relatively small in my line of work.... I would use a tilt-back trailer, or flatbed tow truck, with a winch. Probably a couple of big pry bars and some guys who are familiar with moving. Biggest move I ever did at work was a 24 ton roller crusher, we used chunks of pipe for rollers underneath it, and a crew of guys with pry bars.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    6,451

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter. View Post
    You can do it on your own. I made a skid and pulled mine up on a trailer with a cable winch. Pics on page 2

    https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...ine-uk-259205/
    Easier aid than done.


    JL...............

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Ct
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    2,168

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    Hire a rigger & be done.
    They're insured, experienced, have all the necessary gear and you save your own back.
    Len

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