Page 3 of 10 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 95

Thread: How do you move a 10ee?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kent, U.K.
    Posts
    2,548

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    Easier aid than done.


    JL...............
    Everything is.

    Still, I did what you see in the pics with no help at all.
    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

    Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
    Monarch 10EE 1942

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,911

    Default

    Anyone telling you to use typical rental skates to move a 10ee has likely never moved a 10ee.

    Just because someone calls themself a rigger does not mean they will do a good job. Plenty of horror stories.

    As mentioned via PM, thru-bolting it to a 4'x6' skid will make the machine reistant to tipover and very easy to move with a pallet jack, or fairly easy on 3/4" pipe.

    I think the seller will fork load it.

    A wrecker is not a bad way to unload it, using slings the proper way. Best to have your own slings, lest they show up with chains only. It is always a good idea to get quotes with full names from wrecker companies, because gouging when they have you on the spot is common. Also, be prepared for the quote to be disputed later "Who told you that? We never charge that." etc.

    A Light wrecker would have no trouble with this. A Medium wrecker is huge and cumbersome.

    If you shop around, you should find 2" ratchet straps, with 10K break rating, for about $10 each. Rural King and the big three are sources, though the b3 are pricey recently.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kelowna BC
    Posts
    2,518

    Default

    It would really be a bad move to let that one get away..

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    N.J.
    Posts
    1,659

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    Anyone telling you to use typical rental skates to move a 10ee has likely never moved a 10ee.
    What is it about a 10ee and machinery skates that are a bad mix?

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anderson SC
    Posts
    1,492

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by reggie_obe View Post
    What is it about a 10ee and machinery skates that are a bad mix?
    I am thinking that he surmises that rental skates will be some cheap flimsy things. Not necessarily so, depends where you rent them. Sunbelt has some very heavy duty industrial type ones. I looked into it a while back, the cost wasn't that bad either.... $50 rings a bell.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    11,074

    Default

    Don't know what he was thinking in particular, but imo skates and anything are a potentially bad mix .....unless you run it on three of them (tippy for a lathe), bolt 4 of them in place, its some massive machine with a 8x8 base so there's always a load on each skate or you weld a frame and attach skates to it. Move the 10ee on 1 1/2" round bars and its quite stable. I've got skates and they can be great....but its not a matter of just sliding them under and having at it....if you do, on machines this size its just too easy for one to come out of contact, then you could have 3000 lbs falling over.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 07-08-2019 at 02:04 PM.
    .

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    3,761

    Default

    Wow, I need another project, lathe, making miracles happen like I need a bullet in the head. But I agree, the 10EE is a nice lathe, albeit one that is making think of ways to make it work, rather than will it work for me?

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,911

    Default

    Typical industrial skates are too tall and make the unstable lathe even less stable. Lathes also frequently end up sitting on the skates, rather than securely bolted. Most rental skates are too big for the application. And then there are the attempts to use 4 skates instead of 3. A 10ee can also topple lengthwise. The height of skates encourages that.

    A 4x6 skid takes just a few minutes to build, and a few more to thru-bolt the machine. It is very stable and trivial to move with a pallet jack.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Buffalo NY
    Posts
    4,442

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    Typical industrial skates are too tall and make the unstable lathe even less stable. Lathes also frequently end up sitting on the skates, rather than securely bolted. Most rental skates are too big for the application. And then there are the attempts to use 4 skates instead of 3. A 10ee can also topple lengthwise. The height of skates encourages that.

    A 4x6 skid takes just a few minutes to build, and a few more to thru-bolt the machine. It is very stable and trivial to move with a pallet jack.
    Unless you are going a great distance in an area inaccessible to a forklift,
    you do not need skates. Too high off the ground, as mentioned.
    And they take experience to use, prevent one from kicking out and such.
    I moved some heavy machines using two pallet jacks; one at each end
    of the machine and two people steering and pushing.
    My boring mills I used 5/8" steel rods as rollers and a pry bar.
    If you move many machines, you should get an assortment of favorite bars.

    -Doozer
    DZER

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    518

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    Unless you are going a great distance in an area inaccessible to a forklift,
    you do not need skates. Too high off the ground, as mentioned.
    And they take experience to use, prevent one from kicking out and such.
    I moved some heavy machines using two pallet jacks; one at each end
    of the machine and two people steering and pushing.
    My boring mills I used 5/8" steel rods as rollers and a pry bar.
    If you move many machines, you should get an assortment of favorite bars.

    -Doozer
    Definitely. I use scaffold poles, 2 tons plus for both my lathe and mill, drop-tail trailer behind a 4x4 and winch straight on before prying up enough to get the poles out and ratchet-strapping it down - no problems, both have flat bases like the 10EE.
    I used the little "crawler" skates once and found they slip and slide more than I'm happy with, a piece of timber between skate and machine helps, but not enough for me...

    Dave H. (the other one)
    Rules are for the obedience of fools, and the guidance of wise men.

    Holbrook Model C Number 13 lathe, Testa 2U universal mill, bikes and tools

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •