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Thread: Why 68 Deg. for inspection

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaiguzzi View Post
    Thankyou.
    Again, the 'Mercans are the odd ones out.
    Most of the Rest of the World is Centigrade.
    Most people in the world would just look at you weird when you say 68 Fahrenheit.
    Fahenwhat?
    Where as "mericans look at the rest of the world as just weird. May have something to do with the system of measurement you use!
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaiguzzi View Post
    Thankyou.
    Again, the 'Mercans are the odd ones out.
    Most of the Rest of the World is Centigrade.
    Most people in the world would just look at you weird when you say 68 Fahrenheit.
    Fahenwhat?
    Perhaps some perspective is in order.

    There's exactly one country that has landed men on the moon and then returned them to earth - alive. This is the very country that uses Fahrenheit for common temperature measurement.

    Then there's all the countries in the world who measure temperature in Centigrade or Celsius, who have not landed men on the moon, despite it being nearly an exact half-century since Americans showed the rest of the world how to do it.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnl View Post
    I'm not aware of any standard for air density. But it would have to account for water vapor, e.g. dry air is denser than moist air ...other factors being equal.

    With regard to aviation in the United States, the FAA says this: "Humidity alone is usually not considered an essential factor in calculating density altitude and aircraft performance; however, it does contribute."

    They then go on to say that in excessively hot and humid conditions, performance expectations must be lowered to account for the effects of humidity. I flew commercially for 36 years, and never saw any information that would help a pilot quantify that variable with regard to performance. It may well be that the air-data computers take humidity into account in the calculations they perform, but as a pilot I was never trained any differently that that stated above.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by loose nut View Post
    Where as "mericans look at the rest of the world as just weird. May have something to do with the system of measurement you use!
    It is better then 69 Degrees and better then 67 Degrees, you really should know this (-:

  5. #35
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    Since this thread is rapidly degenerating from the original topic I'll toss in my 2 bits: I'm familiar and comfortable with SI prefixes etc. and well aware that the US is a metric country *for new manufacture*. However, there is a vast amount of legacy applications using Imperial and this will continue for a few more generations most likely. In my own work everything is Imperial unless it involves electronics or scientific applications. Everyday life is Imperial, and I have no problem remembering the relevant facts, units, or doing the math if any is required (not likely). I live on the Canadian border, so I get the weather reports in both systems --however I still struggle to understand what -31C is. Even tho I experience it routinely.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnl View Post
    That 29.92 comes from the standard atmospheric pressure, with a 10 ft adjustment made to represent an approximated height of the altimeter sensor's mounting location in the plane above the runway. Ten feet was reasonable back when the altimeter standard was established, now not so much.

    Don't know about the temperature. Maybe it was the temperature used as the mean in converting station pressure to sea level. ...in fact, that kinda makes sense.
    In practical terms, it sets the standard that all aircraft performance specs are based on, was particularly important during WW2 and for VMC.

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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaiguzzi View Post
    Most of the Rest of the World is Centigrade.
    Most people in the world would just look at you weird when you say 68 Fahrenheit.
    Fahenwhat?
    Most of the rest of the world doesn't have indoor plumbing, either.

  8. #38
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    We are also the only Nation to tagged Saturn with anything. Probably converted Metric to Imperial, worked for Mars.
    mark costello-Low speed steel

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by loose nut View Post
    Why was 68F (20C) chosen as the temp for measuring parts for inspection. I understand why you want a constant temp but why 68 and not 70 or 72???
    Back to the original question, much as I like the metric vs. imperial debates or what type of oil should I use in my scooter.

    Below a link to a 23 page answer published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology in 2007.


    20 CA Short History of the Standard
    Reference Temperature for Industrial
    Dimensional Measurements
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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    Your use of 'Mericans instead of Americans I find highly derogatory.
    You find it weird and have a problem with the name Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit.
    You apparently are accepting of the name Anders Celsius, possibly because he
    uses ten based numbers for freezing and boiling.
    Are your rationale's based on emotion or selfish needs for fulfillment?

    -Doozer
    Well, i have no problem with you calling me a Brit instead of British, nor a Limey instead of an Englishman, nor an Australian calling me a Pom instead of British, but then i'm not a thin skinned, easily offended colonial.
    By the way, we use both imperial & metric in measurements and fasteners, weights and measures, but we measure temperature in C.
    Because we can.

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