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Thread: O.T. You move 18 tons what do you get?

  1. #1
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    Default O.T. You move 18 tons what do you get?

    Well maybe not 18 but I did shovel 4 tons yesterday, had 5 delivered of aggregated 3/4" granite, they dropped it off at 2pm and I had 4 tons hand shoveled and loaded into my wheel barrow and carried 50 ft to it's destination where I got to dump and rake it all done by about 4:30 - pm. not bad for an old gipper...

    the last ton I saved for places I need around the house...

    which does bring me to the meaning of that old song --- I believe it's about guys actually moving 18 tons of coal (by hand) in one day? am I correct? if so look how far we've devolved physically, I had people stopping yesterday to check up on me - people I did not ever know lol

    that's just a guy putting out some brief horsepower for a short term...

    You can rant and rave about how far we've come, but the fact is is were a bunch of pussies compared to yesteryears men...

    I personally know guys 1/3rd my age that would get extremely out of breath just trying to fill one wheel barrow 1/3rd of the way up...


    Edit; might be 16 tons --- either way were a long way off the mark
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 07-12-2019 at 11:56 PM.

  2. #2
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    Not sure the 16 or 18 tons was loaded in a barrow and moved far, in mining it might have been shoveled down a chute to the cars, or put in the barrow, moved a short way, and dumped in the chute. it's "LOAD 16 tons and what do you get get?" the way I learned it.

    Long tome ago I slung coal for a bit, but I'd not have wanted to do it for long.... I was just loading a stoker every day.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 07-13-2019 at 12:19 AM.
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  3. #3
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    I think your right I just checked out the lyrics - loads even worse though as it does imply lifting, although just loading a car from above could mean the same thing,,,

    when I first moved out here (to colo.) I met some of the real McCoys of coal mining --- old men who's hands were all crippled up - god it was amazing to listen to their stories and i do remember them telling me they loaded the coal cars by hand...

    one guy was actually one of our hang-out buddies at the local pub, he was really something, he was like talking to a walking museum, his name was Coke of all things... he's been long gone now but I know where he rests...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    You can rant and rave about how far we've come, but the fact is is were a bunch of pussies compared to yesteryears men...
    -We also live nearly twice as long.

    There was a video floating around here a few years ago, about blacksmithing in something like 1905. It was shot in a foundry at some shipwright, and showed men making anchor chain by literally hand-hammering each link onto the chain. The guy shown had a foot-operated treadle hammer, but did a lot of the beating by hand, with hand-held tongs, in front of a furnace an arm's length away- protected only by a sliding gate lifted by an apprentice.

    There was a stack of chain next to the smith, the size of a small car.

    Then they showed a team of men slapping sheets of near-molten, almost white-hot steel onto an anchor forging, where ten or twelve guys would then hammer the bejeezuz out of it to weld it all together.

    Those guys were MEN. Hot, nasty, back-breaking work, and they did it for pennies a day, eight to ten hours a day, for most of their adult life. At their peak, I'm sure any one of those men could have arm-wrestled Arnold Schwarzenegger at his peak and likely won handily.

    BUT... those same men were likely used up by 35. Their backs ruined, their knees and shoulders shot, ears, eyes and lungs ruined by the working conditions, and virtually no pension or retirement plan.

    Yes, we are indeed a lot softer today, unwilling to do the same kind of backbreaking labor. But in exchange we're living longer, AND doing more work- thanks to machines and automation- in that time.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  5. #5
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    When I was younger shoveling grain on flat bottom bins was not a job I liked.There was about 6-8 ton in each bin and 5 bins was the most 2 of us did in a day.We were shoveling into a auger so not lifting every shovel full,I shoveled one bin a couple years back was sore next day.Grain Vac works pretty slick,we've had one for 30 yrs.

  6. #6
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    That 18 tons now was 16 tons when the song was written. Inflation strikes songs also!
    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  7. #7
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    Loading ties in a Gondola car, in the hot Okanagan sun.. now there is a job everyone should try for while. Not to be missed..

    5 gondola cars with railroad ties flush to the top, is enough ties to lay a mile of track.

  8. #8
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    A couple of days ago I watched a Science Channel Program, one of the series "How the Earth Works," about anak krakatoa, or "child of Krakatoa." The volcano that's re-building in the sea in Indonesia, replacing the big one that blew itself apart in 1883, and before that in 535 AD.

    It was showing the activities of the local Indonesian sulphur miners, as they manually dug out large blocks of sulphur in the most horrendously toxic environment. They would fill two large woven baskets attached to each end of a springy beam-like affair (probably bamboo) to be slung/balanced across the shoulder for carrying.

    At one point the host of the program, a good size guy, attempted to carry a load. He was barely able to stand erect with that on his shoulder. One of the locals, barely half his size, took it from him and hustled off as if it were nothing.
    The point being, this atrophy of physical robustness is purely a sympton of disuse.

  9. #9
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    It may be a symptom of disuse, but arthritis is a symptom of use.

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  10. #10
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    I agree with Doc and others that I would not want to go back to "those days" as it was way too harsh of conditions and they also worked way too hard, I think back to all the old photo's of guys iv seen in the mines and stuff and it's no wonder they looked so tired out,

    and the thing about it is - after loading 16 tons or whatever, they woke up the next day and did it all over again!

    but on the flip side, most nowadays seem to avoid hard work like the plague, and like Lynnl just stated that's creating an entirely different set of problems as we are indeed machines that need to be worked or we will fall into atrophy...

    on a side note; one of my shoulders isn't in the best shape - its not too bad but it does give me problems sometimes when trying to sleep in certain positions, so in anticipation I took some medical cannabis that night to see how things would go - and although my pulse rate was kinda high from all the hard work and that kept me awake some my shoulder did not bug me barely at all, it's supposed to be the stuff that does not get you high but I probably took twice as much as your supposed to and did experience a little of that but not too bad.

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