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Thread: 10EE inspection

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Default 10EE inspection

    Not that this lathe needs another thread, but at least the title is accurate to the topic.
    The tailstock does not have any scrape marks left, even slight ridges

    The compound has battle damage from a crash

    The original speed control rheostat thingy is still there

    And the drive motor is rather large...



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  2. #2
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    Engaging the gear box and listening to sounds, something is squeaky. Maybe no oil in it? Either way the new laser cutter coming will be ideal to make my own gaskets
    This lathe is quickly turning into a restoration project.

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  3. #3
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    Apr 2010
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    Tropical Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    Engaging the gear box and listening to sounds, something is squeaky. Maybe no oil in it? Either way the new laser cutter coming will be ideal to make my own gaskets This lathe is quickly turning into a restoration project.
    That will be more of a boon than you might imagine. Monarch is a good company and will even sell parts that are on the shelf for what they cost back when they were made. That's admirable. However, Gods help you if you need something minor that is not in stock and has to be made. I asked about a gasket during my spindle rebuild. Paper gasket. Nothing special. some paper and some holes. $675.00. 8 week lead time.

    By this point, between my own EE and everyone else's EE, I've made most all the gears in a 10EE. You do not want to go down that particular road, either. Good luck.

  4. #4
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    Its beginning to sound like maybe that AC servo motor conversion was a good idea. Unless its very important to you to keep it original ($$$). I recall the discussion on PM about this, one of the points that was raised, is that a DC drive is going to be "smoother" then anything else, and this is reflected (literally) in the surface finish on parts ASSUMING that everything else is tight and in good condition.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    Its beginning to sound like maybe that AC servo motor conversion was a good idea. Unless its very important to you to keep it original ($$$). I recall the discussion on PM about this, one of the points that was raised, is that a DC drive is going to be "smoother" then anything else, and this is reflected (literally) in the surface finish on parts ASSUMING that everything else is tight and in good condition.
    Honestly, flipping it for a profit is also sounding like a decent option.

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  6. #6
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    And if the Variac on the front is being used to collapse the field in place of one of the parts on this guy

    How on earth is that electric motor turning the Variac in sync with that gizmo to replicate original function?

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Peralta, New Mexico USA
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    I can't tell from the few images posted but I didn't see anything terribly wrong. A few squeaks are to be expected, there's a couple of fairly long belts (motor to spindle is likely a flat belt, and there's a spindle to gearbox flat belt as well) and this plus the idlers will sometimes sing. I have a replacement for the compound if you are looking for one - I think it was bought new from Monarch and then used in a fixture at little use, looks new. But I'd run with yours.

    Not sure about the mods to the drive, you might check to see if the big-ass rheostat is still in the circuit. Since you have it and the whole motor/generator all you need to complete things would be the DC panel under the headstock. It very well could be that the external stuff was added to repair something like the field generating stuff that was not considered economical to repair, or the repair was just faster to do and stuck.

  8. #8
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    Mar 2005
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    Toronto
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    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    Honestly, flipping it for a profit is also sounding like a decent option.
    If you wanted a 911 turbo you can by one new from the dealer for the cost of a small house....or you can work on the one you found a barn for 1500. What would be spirit crushing through, is going back to a Chevette. otoh if you don't have the passion for it or care what car what you drive, maybe flipping it would be best.

    This thing is almost 80 years old. Unlike almost any consumer product, you can still use this thing all day with no need to baby it (like you might an 80 car) .....but its still 80 years old so will likely need some or lot of TLC. The good news is, from sprucing it up a bit to a full reconditioning, there is no lathe more worthy of the time and money.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 08-01-2019 at 07:25 PM.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    If you wanted a 911 turbo you can by one new from the dealer for the cost of a small house....or you can work on the one you found a barn for 1500. What would be spirit crushing through, is going back to a Chevette. otoh if you don't have the passion for it or care what car what you drive, maybe flipping it would be best.

    This thing is almost 80 years old. Unlike almost any consumer product, you can still use this thing all day with no need to baby it (like you might an 80 car) .....but its still 80 years old so will likely need some or lot of TLC. The good news is, from sprucing it up a bit to a full reconditioning, there is no lathe more worthy of the time and money.
    The little voice in my head is saying keep everything, so I will. The female unit is on my ass about my credit card not being paid off, not that it matters. Make enough in one paycheck to pay it all off, but you know how that is...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    I been watching this 10EE thread(s) going for awhile. And I been wondering,,,,,,,
    What is it about that complicated drive that tops all the others,?
    If that DC drive was so good, why hasnt Clausing, LeBlonde, American, Pacemaker, South Bend, Logan, and the rest haven't adopted it? Why didn't they adopt that 60 years ago?
    Why is the DC motor drive a seemingly new thing on the machines as of lately?
    Why go to the trouble of a electric motor driving a electric generator, to drive another motor?
    OMG !!! the parasitic losses are tremendous !!!!
    You would be efficiency ahead if you simply had a gas generator driving the final DC drive and be done with it !!!
    Why is this thing so complicated and it seems no one else adopted the technology?
    Just an inquiring mind that asks to know.......

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