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Thread: OT: House painting

  1. #11
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    May 2013
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    I find Paul's posts interesting and similar 'mundane' off topic posts from others, including one no longer welcomed on the forum. They give insight into the different materials and ways of doing things over your side of the pond.

  2. #12
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    that grey is a perfect match for that electrical box and conduit - I like Paul - except when he's mean to me and calls me names he's a nice guy

  3. #13
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    Jan 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by polaraligned View Post
    I would never use flat on the exterior of a house...dirt magnet with no durability and washability.
    x's 1,000
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  4. #14
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    May 2015
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    The pigment in good paints is usually titanium dioxide, while cheap paints generally have something like silica (ground up sand). The more good pigment, the better the coverage. Since most of the cost of a paint job is labor, I usually get the best paint I can buy.

  5. #15
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    Oct 2013
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    This flat paint clearly states that it is washable and durable, but I would agree that satin or gloss would be better for high contact and wear items, such as doors, windowsills, and trim. I weighed this bucket of paint and it is almost 70 pounds, according to this old ugly scale:



    The weight may be a good indicator of the amount of solid material, and thus perhaps coverage and durability. I may decant some of this paint into 1 or 2 gallon lidded buckets for easier handling and storage. I had several buckets of latex paints stored on the porch and in my old shed, and they were unusable, probably from freezing. But I had other latex paint downstairs in my other (unheated) house, and it is OK. I think it may be that being below grade with thick stone walls keeps the temperature generally above freezing.

    John spent a few hours today doing additional preparation, mostly scraping, cleaning, and rinsing. Some of the old paint developed large blisters after being sprayed with detergent and rinsed with the hose. Also found some rotten wood siding that will need to be replaced.

  6. #16
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    May 2006
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    FWIW the best place for flat paint is ceilings - in fact most paints for ceilings are just that - they really don't get a chance to attract dirt unless you burn wood or it's in the kitchen with lots of greasy cooking, in fact high gloss can look kinda funny on ceilings and yes bring out all kinds of imperfections,,,

    5 gallons would be allot of ceiling paint,

    using it as a base coat on the house exterior is not a bad idea as long as it's still rated for outdoor use - would be a huge mistake to use something inferior after going through all kinds of work and also tossing a better finish paint on top of it,,,


    it's not a question whether or not the top coat will stick to the flat paint, it will - it's a question if the flat paint will stick to the house and other paint and keep from peeling or cracking or blistering,,,

    using it for ceiling paint is a very safe decision IF you can deal with the off white color...

  7. #17
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    Mar 2018
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    Finland
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    Americans should paint more houses red

  8. #18
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    Jul 2011
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    Medford MA
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    A long time ago I used the Home Depot house brand (Behr?)
    Never again.
    It didnít cover, it looked crappy.

    Now we pay for the good stuff from Sherwin Williams or Benjamin Moore, it coats better, lasts longer, looks great. As the old advertisement went ... you can pay now, or pay later.

    Frank

  9. #19
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    Oct 2013
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    When I had both houses painted around 2006, we bought what was supposedly the best paint available, and IIRC it was $250/5 gallons, and we got three buckets. It was definitely enough for both houses, which I estimate are about 2600 square feet. He may have applied two coats, at least in some places. But he did not paint the back of the larger house (715), because much of the original siding had been rotten and I had replaced it (temporarily) with plywood and scrap pieces. That section is about 8 feet high and 48 feet wide = 384 sf.

    The wooden porch on the 713 house is gray, but I don't think this flat paint would work very well for that. However, the floor might need some major repair or replacement, so it should be OK as (another) temporary measure.

    Some time ago I had looked into getting "liquid vinyl" paint, and I even got a sample, which I think came in two parts with an activator. I never used the sample, and although I still have it somewhere, it might have gone bad. Maybe I can try it on my Adirondack chairs or some of the trim.

    http://www.liquidvinylsiding.net/





    It is 15 times thicker than paint, and is rather expensive, although they claim it is half the cost of vinyl siding. A 12 square foot piece of vinyl siding is about $7, so it would cost about $1600 to do both houses. With labor costs, I saw estimates of about $6000 to $15,000.

    https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/sid...-installation/
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 08-05-2019 at 02:35 PM.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by fjk View Post
    A long time ago I used the Home Depot house brand (Behr?)
    Never again.
    It didn’t cover, it looked crappy.

    Now we pay for the good stuff from Sherwin Williams or Benjamin Moore, it coats better, lasts longer, looks great. As the old advertisement went ... you can pay now, or pay later.

    Frank
    Yep. The line I've often heard, "Only rich people can afford to use cheap paint!"

    I've always subscribed to that notion. Considering all the prep work and effort that goes into a paint job, the price of the paint is trivial.

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