Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29

Thread: OT: House painting

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    5,468

    Default

    Got this paint today at Lowes - about $190. I was able to lift this 5 gallon bucket with relative ease - it's only 50 pounds compared to almost 70 for the Walmart paint. Must be some mighty heavy pigment in there. Lead or uranium? Maybe I should check it with a Geiger counter. Pitchblende (uraninite) has a specific gravity of almost 11. Titanium Dioxide is 4.2. Zinc Oxide is 5. Lead Carbonate is 6.6.

    Specific gravity of black pigments: Titanium Black 4.5, Manganese Dioxide 5.0, Iron Black (Ferrous metal oxide) 5.0, Carbon Black 2.0

    The most likely reason for the unusually heavy weight may be that the pigment added considerably more volume, so it is more than 5 gallons of liquid in the container. It was very full when I opened it.



    Hopefully John will start painting tomorrow early AM.
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 08-05-2019 at 09:55 PM. Reason: Black pigments

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Huntsville Ala
    Posts
    5,855

    Default

    If the buckets list the number of ounces, compare those. I didn't realize for severl years that the paint companies had started selling "gallons" of paint that are considerably less than a true gallon (forgotten the exact amount). But occasionally I've seen a true gallon.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    389

    Default

    When it comes to paint for wooden house facades, which basically all facades in Finland are made of if they aren't brick, concrete or plaster. I like the classic "falu red" color or punamulta, recipe goes back to the 1400s. It's simple, cheap, good looking and porous.

    Modern paints... they are like plastic, they form a layer of plastic on top of the wood. In theory this is good since it stops water from getting into the wood. In reality, water always 100% gets in anyway and now it is trapped and rot sets in the wood in these places. This is not so severe on houses where the facade is a rain screen, which is the common way to build them here because then there is a place for the moisture to leave the wood and be vented away. Any sort of single stage facade though is most likely gonna result in mold and rotting facades with short lifespans.

    Modern paints are really disastrous if used on wooden windows, they don't have places to let water escape. Wooden window frames with slow growth pine heartwood which can last centuries can be ruined in less than a decade with modern paints. For this application one still uses old linseed oil based paints.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    5,468

    Default

    Good point. When we were using a hose spray to clean some of the previously painted surfaces, it developed small blisters that got larger and then ruptured and peeled off. Most of the siding is original wood from around 1877, and I have heard that it may be Cypress.



    When I bought this house (713), it had green asbestos shingles over the original wood. Around 2002 I stripped off some of the siding where I had built the deck and installed patio doors:


    This is how it looks now. In 2006 I stripped all the old asbestos siding off, with the help of a friend, and he also scraped, wire-brushed, and painted the wood siding and old windows on both houses. The porch is all new wood siding, primed and painted, but probably white pine. Some of that has already started to rot. In 2010 I had a contractor install new double-pane vinyl windows.



    Maybe the old-time whitewash in lieu of paint has its merits, and probably would not cause the water trapping and rot as you mention.

    https://www.askthebuilder.com/whitewash-recipe/

    https://www.theprairiehomestead.com/...barn-coop.html

    https://www.apieceofrainbow.com/whitewash-wood-3-ways/

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    389

    Default

    That's something different than I am used to, I wonder if it works on plaster, I would like to give my outdoor kitchen a bit whiter look.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    N.J.
    Posts
    1,658

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    Good point. When we were using a hose spray to clean some of the previously painted surfaces, it developed small blisters that got larger and then ruptured and peeled off. Most of the siding is original wood from around 1877, and I have heard that it may be Cypress.
    Those blisters were areas where the paint either never adhered due to poor prep or from previous moisture intrusion. I hope you are taking the time to scrape and feather the old paint in these areas otherwise the finished paint job might resemble the skin of a burn victim.

    It is very unlikely that the siding is cypress. Even if purchased from a local mill one hundred years ago, Cypress would have been a higher end wood. Cedar would have been the more common choice. If it were Cypress, I doubt you would be seeing the rot you have described.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    5,468

    Default

    I don't think it's Cedar - at least it doesn't have that sort of grain or smell - but it's 150 years old! Rotted siding was a much more recent addition, and it just seemed to have a bad spot (top). Bottom piece is a piece of original siding:



    Two such pieces of old siding - has a nice grain, and still mostly solid.


    South end is mostly done:


    Repair needed here:


    Replacement piece fitted and caulked:


    Ugly old porch railing:




    Really ugly!


    After wire brushing and a coat of paint:


    The good, the bad, and the still ugly. I think paint was too thick which caused streaks and rough spots:


    Ugly yuckling no more:


    "Master painter" at work:

    http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/hous...nting_5655.AVI (120 MB)

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    449

    Default

    Just to comment on your original question, I have used Velspar flat white exterior paint. However, I used it on the interior walls and ceiling of my new shop about 10 years ago. They were not offering it with the primer mixed in back then so I primed the bare drywall first then rolled on two top coats. It stunk for few weeks but I am very pleased with the results. The flat white is easy on the eyes and it cleans up well. Even when I sprayed 90w oil on the wall once, it cleaned right up without taking the paint with it.

    Tom

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    5,468

    Default

    Tom, thanks for the info. It seems like good paint.

    Another project related to the house painting will be fixing this pump house which is adjacent to the house. Originally (perhaps 100-150 years ago) this house (713) shared a shallow (15 foot) hand dug well that was on the other house (715-717) that I purchased in 1977. The people in 713 had a separate pump in this pit that had a dip tube into the well. Around 1985 the residents along this stretch of Warren Road petitioned for and got a municipal water main extension that eliminated the need for the well, and the supply from the street came into this pit and connected to the outside hose connection and the house itself. When I bought the house (713) in 1989 it had a large, heavy plywood cover that had to be "person-handled" to access the pit. It was a hassle and became rotten, so I added a frame around the pit and used the top of an old steel desk, with hinges, for easier access. There was also a plywood piece nailed to the frame, but it rotted:



    Looking down into the pit through that opening:




    The outlet shown here is used for the heating tape I added to the pipes, and it connects through UF cable to a GFCI in the kitchen. Recently, the GFCI tripped, and will not reset. I think I see why. So, yet another project to keep me (and probably my handyman buddy) busy:

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •