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Thread: Going for Inguinal Hernia Surgery- What to expect?

  1. #11
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    Jul 2017
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    Buffalo NY USA
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    What JRouche said. Do not delay on the meds. Go directly from the hospital to the pharmacy and fill out your prescriptions, starting immediately with them and follow that to the letter.

    I had them drill a hole saw thru my skull back in May and re-arrange a few things in there. I waited till the next day to get my meds. Big mistake, the pain was "interesting". When I finally got the meds, it was Alice in Wonderland with a bit of Jimi Hendrix... higher than a kite and not feeling much of anything. After a few days it all wore off so I was just sore instead of hurting. Thank goodness I didn't try to drive or something equally stupid. Hide the keys.

    Make sure to lay in enough supplies that you won't have to go anywhere, and have some good people around you at all times for the first few days. You ain't gonna remember much.

  2. #12
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    Been there, done that... Mesh repair done on both sides a couple of years ago.
    No long-term problems, just the occasional twinge on one side if I stretch too far.
    Recovery time was a couple of weeks. First few days you'll feel a bit second-hand, but you'll get over it. Later, lathe work will not a problem, just don't lift anything or stretch to reach anything overhead for a couple of months.
    The internal bleeding turns your wedding tackle black, which is a novelty for a white man. It fades after a couple of weeks.
    As with any general anaesthetic, be aware that your reactions and cognitive functions will be impaired for much longer than the experts claim. Be extra cautious driving, and don't even think of flying an aeroplane for at least a week.
    Good luck.

  3. #13
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    May 2011
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    Piece of cake.

    I had a double hernia which I dealt with for about 6 years before I went in to get it fixed. Had I known how easy it was going to be I would have done it far sooner. They did that bit where they just put a couple of holes to either side of your belly button and one alongside your belly button to put the air hose in (not kidding). They have to inflate the area between the fat and the muscle so they can work on it. All the rest was done with optic scopes and a monitor. They used the mesh which your body tissue eventually grows into and stapled it in place with titanium staples. This type of surgery heals far faster than a general incision - the way they did it in the old days. When the anesthetic wore off after I was back home (this was an outpatient procedure) I did feel some pain but it wasn't all that bad I could easily deal with it. This took place during the winter and I couldn't walk outside, but after the second day I walked within my house from one end to the other over and over again and at one point it hit me ... all pain was gone. Like I said it is a piece of cake. Get it over with. I haven't had any problems with it since it was done. The very worst part of the whole thing was the post-op constipation caused by the anesthetic. The procedure itself was a walk in the park.

  4. #14
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    Dec 2007
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    Montvale, NJ
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    Thanks guys. I appreciate your input and will heed your advice.
    I will let you know how it goes.
    I am more apprehensive about the general anesthesia than the pain afterwards. Not worried about it killing me, just an anxiety of the drugs that literally paralyze your body so you can't even breath on your own. And if you become conscious, you can't move to signal a problem. That is scary to me.
    Last edited by polaraligned; 08-04-2019 at 09:07 PM.

  5. #15
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    May 2015
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    Had bilateral inguinal surgery about 35 years ago. After about 25 years the right side bulged out again. This time the hernia was repaired by inserting a mesh in keyhole surgery. No problems since.

  6. #16
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    May 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by polaraligned View Post
    Thanks guys. I appreciate your input and will heed your advice.
    I will let you know how it goes.
    I am more apprehensive about the general anesthesia than the pain afterwards. Not worried about it killing me, just an anxiety of the drugs that literally paralyze your body so you can't even breath on your own. And if you become conscious, you can't move to signal a problem. That is scary to me.
    Actually, the general anesthetic was my greatest concern as well. That was a piece of cake too. When I was a kid I had to have an emergency appendectomy and a year later I had to have my tonsils removed. Back then they used ether (gas) and it was horrible. After you woke up there was serious cognitive impairment for awhile and you would vomit brown guck for a half day. The anesthetic they use now is a drip. You wake up totally refreshed from a dreamless sleep with absolutely NO discomfort resulting from the anesthetic at all.

    I clearly remember after being wheeled into surgery a young man telling me that he was starting the drip. I made a conscious effort to try to determine when I felt the drug beginning to work ... no chance ... after about 20 seconds I was out. The next thing I knew I was in post-op with my nephew's wife holding my hand. (She was a nurse there.) I was a bit groggy but totally alert like when you wake up in the morning, which is understandable, but nothing like what I experienced with ether as a child. I just felt the way you do when you wake up from a satisfying sleep. All my worries about the anesthetic proved to be pointless in the end.
    Last edited by DATo; 08-04-2019 at 09:47 PM. Reason: spelling and added a bit

  7. #17
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    Thanks DATo. That is calming to my anxious brain.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by polaraligned View Post
    Thanks DATo. That is calming to my anxious brain.
    I wish I had had someone to "calm MY anxious brain" before I went in *LOL* My only experience with surgery were the events I mention in my last post and I was terrified which was why it took 6 years to have the surgery done. I could have kicked myself in the butt after it was over for having lived with that debilitating condition for so long.

  9. #19
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    Cripes, if I went home on the third day after having my aortic valve replaced you should be fine. Modern medicine is magic these days.

    The worst part about mine was they shaved me from neck to knees. And I mean everything! (At least they waited until I was out--No embarrassment.)

  10. #20
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    Oct 2013
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    I haven't had hernia surgery but I've had many others. Tonsilectomy in 1954 or so was traumatic - I fought the doctors forcing the ether mask so much that they had to give me a double dose and I was miserable for days as a result. But in 1994 I had arthroscopic surgery for torn meniscus - the only bad part was having to stick me several times to get the IV in. Then in 1999 I had nasal surgery for deviated septum, with no problems, but I was very nervous going in. Then in 2001 my first colonoscopy discovered a cancerous polyp, and I had successful surgery on the day after 9/11. The worst part, by far, was the nasty bowel cleansing prep. That was major abdominal surgery, but the pain was only moderate, and I had a patient-acuated morphine drip, which I rarely needed.

    Fast forward 12 years, to 2013, when I went in for total joint replacement for right hip, which had been bone-on-bone for several years with a lot of pain. I think that was done with spinal tap anesthesia and light general anesthesia, and there was only moderate post-op pain and almost full recovery in 4 weeks. But I still had major spine problems from congenital spinal stenosis, so in 2015 I had my first surgery, which was an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, which was scary, but everything worked out well, and I am the surgeon's "poster boy" for such a great outcome. Then in early 2016 I had posterior lumbar spine surgery, which was also quite successful and relatively painless - especially since I had heard horror stories about bad experiences.

    By now I was getting used to going in for surgery, and I actually looked forward to the correction of the (orthopedic) problems that had bothered me for 30 years, as well as the recuperation at a good rehab facility. Watching the election returns in 2016 contributed to my having a gall bladder attack, for which I underwent surgery December 28. That was basically in and out same day surgery and I was almost up to going to a NYE party, but just not quite. Pain was minimal.

    Finally, in March 2017, I went in for a total left knee replacement, which was done with spinal tap anesthesia, and recovery was pretty quick - 10 days at rehab and 4 more weeks at home.

    It helped me to take a Diazepam or Lorazepam just before going to the hospital (with doctor's approval), and they usually put a mild sedative in the IV drip so you will be relaxed when the full anesthetic is administered. I found that I just felt a bit of a hot sensation when the chemicals entered the vein, and seconds later I was out. I was alert when it wore off, but then it took maybe a half-hour for the spinal tap to allow feeling and movement of lower extremities.

    You'll be just fine - don't sweat it

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