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Thread: Diagnosing car issue - AC blower

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    3,939

    Default Diagnosing car issue - AC blower

    My final thought is that the front blower motor is drawing too much current.
    Here is the backstory:
    8 months ago I replaced the resistor that controlled the fan speed. Fixed the problem. 3 months ago problem came back intermittently. Ordered a new resistor to replace when I got around to it. Few weeks ago, the switch on the front panel failed. This switch directly switched on the current to the motor through the resistor to the blower.
    Just replaced the AC panel and switch. Fan still doesn't work. Just went to replace the resistor pack and discovered this...

    The plug from the blower to the resistor.
    So I ordered a new blower assembly for 60$, only thing I can think of that would be killing components. Sound good?
    Last edited by RB211; 08-10-2019 at 03:26 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    winnipeg
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    90

    Default

    A plugged cabin filter causes an air restriction, which then causes the resister to overheat and melt.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    SE Texas
    Posts
    12,500

    Default

    They have filters in auto ACs? What makes and models have that?

    And more to the point, where are they? How do you find them?



    Quote Originally Posted by amateur View Post
    A plugged cabin filter causes an air restriction, which then causes the resister to overheat and melt.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    SF East Bay.
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    6,555

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    They have filters in auto ACs? What makes and models have that?

    And more to the point, where are they? How do you find them?
    I've seen them in different places. Some have them in the cowling at the base of the windshield (a Cadillac) and others behind the glovebox (two Toyota models).
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Default

    In the Kia Sedona, the front blower resistor is located in the airstream duct, downstream from the blower, below and to the left of the glove box.
    The cabin air filter was placed upside down and was dirty. Can't trust anyone to do your mx.

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Central Ms
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    1,195

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    Honda Odyssey cabin air filter is below the glove box.
    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

    Lewis Grizzard

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Default

    Either way, no A/C in Florida is the equivalent of no car.

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Old and new resistors are testing the same... unless they are both bad and I haven't found the new one yet...
    Leads of my multimeter measure about 0.4 ohms. Both test about 0.7, 1.2, and 2.4. Highest speed must be straight battery voltage and doesn't go through the resistor, as there is no connection for that on the resistor. Time to extract the blower fan...

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    1,042

    Default

    I know on GM trucks, it's not unusual for the connector to melt like that. They seem to have selected connectors that just barely meet the power requirements of the connection (same with the connectors to the DRLs).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    N.J.
    Posts
    1,695

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    Old and new resistors are testing the same... unless they are both bad and I haven't found the new one yet...
    Leads of my multimeter measure about 0.4 ohms. Both test about 0.7, 1.2, and 2.4. Highest speed must be straight battery voltage and doesn't go through the resistor, as there is no connection for that on the resistor. Time to extract the blower fan...

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
    One typical presentation of this issue is the blower fan bushings wear, causing drag and increased current. The resistor eventually burns out and you only have one fan speed. The wear progresses to the point where the fan starts to howl and/or takes out the switch contacts as well from the increased current.

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