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Thread: Can You Weld on a ASME Tank?

  1. #11
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    Please don’t weld on a compressor tank. Not concerned you might get hurt, that would be getting your Darwin award. Concerned about the innocent person killed while having no idea how that could happen.

    I was told that someone cut their hand off on a machine I built. Worse day of my life. Fortunately they lost only partial use of their hand due to an infection not the severity of the injury. I got sued and when I realized EVERYONE except the injured guy was lying I got really angry. Because he got hurt on a bad COPY of the machine built by a bozo his company hired. $15,000 later the judge let me out of the lawsuit as it became apparent I wasn’t responsible. I still felt bad for the injured guy and I hope the facts got him a huge settlement.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
    Probably not a good idea. Even a (relatively) low pressure washer will exceed the burst rating of most tanks by
    a significant amount. Hydro testing a small tank like you describe doesn't need more than 300 PSI or so.

    ..
    1 1/2 times the max operating pressure is normal for a renewal test, 2x plus 10% for original test.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

  3. #13
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    Mar 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by loose nut View Post
    Can you yes, should you No.

    Compressor tanks are registered pressure vessels and to do it "legally" you have to jump through many hoops and procedures. Welding tickets, welding procedures, paper work up the ying yang, hydro-static testing afterwards and maybe x-rays to boot plus government inspection and certification. All that if it is done at a licensed welding shop, you have to provide that if you do it yourself, if you want to remain legal AND the gov'ment says OK, which they probably won't. If you don't care about being legal then forget all that but remember those tanks are bombs waiting to go off and welding on them will alter them, possibly not for the best.

    That being said I brazed up a rust out on the bottom of my tank about 15 years ago and it is still going strong, but not a good idea.
    that is how I did it on my tank, the bottom rubbed a hole when moved fixed it and had it for maybe 10 years that way
    Ed
    Agua Dulce, So.California
    1950 F1 street rod
    1949 F1 stock V8 flathead
    1948 F6 350 chevy/rest stock, no dump bed
    1953 chevy 3100 AD for 85 S10 frame have a 4BT cummins motor, NV4500
    1968 Baha Bug with 2.2 ecotec motor, king coil-overs,P/S

  4. #14
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    Feb 2005
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    gettysburg pa.
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    it depends can you weld or do you just think you can? I have welded on tanks with no problems, have one in my shop I welded some rust holes. use it every day no bombs. there

  5. #15
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    If I read the OSHA requirements correctly there is no requirement for ASME certification on an air tank unless it's used in a shipyard.
    Certainly there is none required for use in a home shop.
    Seastar
    I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob308 View Post
    it depends can you weld or do you just think you can?
    Well that is the real trick isn't it.

    I have seen so many people on YouTube showing others how to weld when really they shouldn't be allowed near welding equipment let alone allowed to try and "instruct" others. Welding is a skill, one of the hardest to master, it takes years of effort and welding pressure vessels is a big step above fixing a trailer hitch. That's why there is so many rules, regulations and procedures to follow.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

  7. #17

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    Wow! Talk about making a mountain out of a mole hole? When my 30 gallon tank on my compressor rusted though, I removed the paint and exposed the shiny metal to the thickest metal around the rusted hole, welded it and it still holds pressure today. NEVER gave it a thought about all of the above. Would do it again, after reading all of this.....

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seastar View Post
    If I read the OSHA requirements correctly there is no requirement for ASME certification on an air tank unless it's used in a shipyard.
    Certainly there is none required for use in a home shop.
    Seastar
    That may depend on what state you are in.... NY requires tanks to be ASME if they are used in a business... if its just your own personal stuff then yeah do whatever you want, but if anything happens, the insurance company will laugh in your face. FWIW I did ASME work for a living back in the 1990's, so yeah I do know how to weld.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    That may depend on what state you are in.... NY requires tanks to be ASME if they are used in a business.

    Same for WA

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
    Wow! Talk about making a mountain out of a mole hole? When my 30 gallon tank on my compressor rusted though, I removed the paint and exposed the shiny metal to the thickest metal around the rusted hole, welded it and it still holds pressure today. NEVER gave it a thought about all of the above. Would do it again, after reading all of this.....
    If it's a really big mole........

    No one said you couldn't do it but if it does fail then what. Oh is that a $#!+ storm I see on the horizon.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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