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Thread: Titanium. What is the fascination with it? Watching Battlebots.

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    it's also extremely fatigue resistant while being extra flexible,,, for a metal I don't think there's anything comparable,
    "flexibility" is good point. Titanium has low elastic modulus or Young's modulus (only about 50% of steel) and strength comparable to many steels.
    Low elastic modulus makes it more "rubbery" so it can absorb higher impact energy.

    Would suck as a machine tool building material other than springs tho..

  2. #12
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    Biocompatibility is another good feature of Ti alloys. So great for bone plates and screws as bone tissue will happily grow around Ti. If stainless steel bone screws are exposed to bending stresses will work Harden and fracture Ti screw much less tendency to do this.

  3. #13
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    Parts where you want a lot of.motion while keeping stress down... Titanium flex joint was a code for "big pipe that flexed like crazy"
    Chemical resistance, at least for certain things.
    Pretty high strength to weight ratio, especially for the higher strength alloys.
    Non-magnetic and pretty strong.
    Making showers of.purple sparks when you bead blast.
    Eating cutting tools.

    And, lest we not forget,.sex appeal ;-)

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    "flexibility" is good point. Titanium has low elastic modulus or Young's modulus (only about 50% of steel) and strength comparable to many steels.
    Low elastic modulus makes it more "rubbery" so it can absorb higher impact energy.

    Would suck as a machine tool building material other than springs tho..
    So much for selling $500 titanium boring bars!

  5. #15
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    It is one of the few metals which can be used within the human body and not cause a reaction. My knee joint, however is cobalt chrome, perhaps titanium is not so good with low friction moving joints.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by old mart View Post
    It is one of the few metals which can be used within the human body and not cause a reaction. My knee joint, however is cobalt chrome, perhaps titanium is not so good with low friction moving joints.
    If ”old mart” starts to sound suddenly ”really old mart” I’d worry a bit
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28122467

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Nickel View Post
    -Well, first off, if you're referring to Warhead's "dome", keep in mind that was the robot's primary weapon. The dome was a spinning flywheel with two teeth on the rim. A lightweight carbon-fiber dome wouldn't pack the same inertia/energy.

    Second, properly layering and bonding CF and aluminum is tricky and expensive. Getting back to the cost-to-benefit ratio, is the cost, effort and time involved in making the CF part worth the weight savings? In my opinion, for a non-flying machine, where a certain amount of weight (and therefore traction) is beneficial, the cost of CF isn't justifiable.

    As for 'reactive' armor, I'm assuming you mean "ablative", not "reactive" as in explosive, as used on main battle tanks. Lots of competitors use replaceable armor plates, where the actual shell/armor is separate from the actual chassis of the 'bot. And more than one competitor has used actual ablative armor-designed to be peeled away in a hit to protect the chassis.

    The problem with that is, unless the bout ends with a "knockout"- the bot being rendered immobile/unable to compete- it goes down to a judge's decision. And one of the parameters the judges use is damage inflicted on an opponent- which would include pieces of ablative armor peeled off and scattered about the box.

    It's generally seen as better to build actual resistant armor- or better yet to design the chassis so the frame IS the armor and vice-versa.

    Doc.
    Didn't realize the dome was part of his spinning weapon. My line of tactical reasoning would be going straight at nightmare, the dome absorbing the initial impact with the ablative armor doing its job, while your horizontal spinner tears him to bits. His vertical spinner isn't a robust design once you get past his initial hit

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  8. #18
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    If this discussion got started from the broken titanium flipping arm a short while ago I wonder if it wasn't a weld that let go and not the fault of the titanium. I saw that happen and it looked like it might have broken at a "bend" in the arm where it might have been joined with a weld. I have no experience with ti or welding it but I have read that it needs to be well shielded on both sides to not become brittle from welding.

  9. #19
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    dupe post
    Last edited by JRouche; 08-19-2019 at 04:22 PM.
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by old mart View Post
    It is one of the few metals which can be used within the human body and not cause a reaction. My knee joint, however is cobalt chrome, perhaps titanium is not so good with low friction moving joints.
    My father had a WWII army pal who had an "aluminum" plate in his skull (as it was described to me). Any kind of aluminum/alloy seems improbable - but I don't know the state of WWII medical metallurgy. Perhaps "aluminum" was just shorthand for something more exotic?


    When my young self asked about the plate, my father would chortle: "A German 88 shell took the top of his head off." Not being familiar with shrapnel, I imagined a large, intact projectile doing the deed. Whenever the gentleman came to visit us, he would have to limit his exposure to direct sunlight, as it caused expansion of the plate and discomfort.

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