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Thread: Bench Top Milling Machines

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Somerset UK
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    2,445

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    If you use a Bridgeport as a benchtop, don't forget a ladder.

  2. #22
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    Sep 2009
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
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    465

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    Here's a link to a Tree 2URVC manual. Page 10 gives all the measurements. It will certainly fit in the space you have available . You might not get full table travel, but certainly more than any benchtop model.

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/4860/6089.pdf

    I wish I was a little closer. It's a duplicate of the mill I used for many years, and the one I would have chosen had it been available in our area at the time I was looking I would have snaped it up in a minute
    Last edited by projectnut; 08-24-2019 at 09:34 PM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Edmonton Alberta
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    1,591

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    [QUOTE=RB211;1252548] If you are going to buy new, stick with tools made in Taiwan, and avoid all Chinese machines. If you can, stick to industrial machines.
    Do not fall for the trap that a smaller machine will be easier to handle and move around, there’s a reason machine tools weigh a lot. If you set yourself up to move 1000 lbs, then you can move around 3,000 lbs. Remove the fear and barrier of moving heavy equipment; It opens the door to quality industrial machines that are usually cheaper because they are 3 phase and weigh a lot.

    I would not say every thing from China is junk,my 1988 Mazak Clone Lathe has been great.I do agree that people should not shy away from Industrial machines.Your only moving it once and 3ph machines can be powered different ways and most if only at half the HP makes up for it,with being extra heavy and increased capacity.As was mentioned the Tree Mills are very nice and built sturdy,my neighbor has one its great.The RF -45 would be my choice as far as table top models,have seen them drill some good size holes in low gear.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    600

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    gettysburg pa.
    Posts
    922

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    if it does not have a knee then it is not a mill but just a heavy drill press.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    3,910

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    Quote Originally Posted by AD5MB View Post
    I'll tell you why I would not buy it, it's made by Sieg.
    However, if one was given to me, I would use it as an exercise in hand scraping and tool refurbishing.

    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    NE Thailand
    Posts
    1,226

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    Quote Originally Posted by bob308 View Post
    if it does not have a knee then it is not a mill but just a heavy drill press.
    Vicious.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Southwestern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    5,479

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    Vicious, maybe.

    Machine snobbery, probably will only buy old 'Merican iron. If it uses endmills it is a milling machine, maybe not big and fancy but small is better for some and that is all many can get/handle or have room for.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Ct
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    2,191

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    Stefan Gotteswinter makes bench top machines sing and dance so I wouldn't pick the machine first as lacking in performance.
    Choose your project scale, develop your skills and make continual improvements in yourself and equipment as necessary and you'll
    be far ahead of just cheesin' off because you own a big, commercial machine.
    Len

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    465

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    As mentioned I would not shy away from industrial machines. All the machines in my shop are "industrial". The oldest is a lineshaft driven lathe that now has it's own single phase 1.5 hp motor. I also have a 1940's era horizontal mill that was converted to a 220 V single phase motor long before I got it. There are other machines that have retained their original 220/440 volt 3 phase motors (Bridgeport milling machine, Jet drill press, Sheldon lathe, Racine power hacksaw, & Black Diamond drill grinder). Several more, among them a Sanford surface grinder, Delta/Rockwell belt disk sander, AMMCO shaper, among others that started their industrial lives with 220 volt single phase motors and still retain them.

    The 3 phase motors all run on phase converters, while the 220v, and 120 v machines use standard single phase household current. The shop has it's own sub panel with individual circuits for machines, outlets, and lighting. The house was setup this way when we built it in the late 1980's. The last thing I wanted was to have to fumble through the dark trying to find the breaker box if something tripped a circuit.

    As an FYI at least in this area industrial 3 phase machines are generally less expensive than those marketed to the hobbyists. Granted they are a bit larger and heavier, but as said, since you're only moving them once the extra effort is worth the time and money. I personally disassembled and moved all the machines to my shop by myself with the exceptions the base of the mill, (1,000 lbs.), and the headstock cabinet of the Sheldon lathe (800 lbs.) down the flight of stairs. I drew the line at about 600 lbs. when I moved the Challenge cast iron surface plate and stand down the stairs. It was doable, but at my absolute limits.
    Last edited by projectnut; 08-25-2019 at 02:45 PM.

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