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Thread: O/T: Engine Oil changes?

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    X2! To what AKB just stated.

    One has to use caution as sometimes the cure can be worse that the ailment.
    I know of one guy that took out an oil pump due to debris that plugged the pump's intake screen after a chemical clean, I still can't believe that he didn't loose the bottom end of his engine. Sometimes it's better to be lucky than good.

    It is well known that certain engines are more prone to sludge formation than others, I know certain models of Chrysler and Toyotas also share this nasty trait. It is often why engine manufacturers are very adamant about using only oils that meet their specifications. I know that VW/Audi have had their own specs for a number of years and they are not shy about specifying to only use those approved oils, many don't and get away with it, some don't.

    I realize that that you mentioned as having an Audi A8 CalM and the link I'll leave specifies an A4 but the advice given in the link still applies.

    https://www.bgprod.com/blog/bg-solve...ticky-problem/









    Im dragging this over to the next page and will add --- BG is one hell of a company - if anyone builds "miracles in a can" its them...


    also side note on certain engines being more prone to sludge, anything small displacement high horsepower (I.E. as esp. in turbo's) anytime your creating immense power out of a small package your roasting certain internals and it WILL cause thermal breakdown of the oil which leads to sludge,,, much of the sludge is actually plastic viscosity index stabilizers that are roasted...

    one of the engines I was talking about cooking it's rods due to sludge breakdown and plugging it's filter had 3 strikes against it --- turbo 4 cylinder with a trailer hitch and in the state of colorado,,, does not take any abacus to figure out that somebody spilled the gruel...

  2. #82
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    turbo 4 cylinder with a trailer hitch and in the state of colorado
    OUCH!
    That'll do it.
    Once the filter is plugged and into bypass mode it's only a matter of time before oil galleries, jets, and passages get plugged as well.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  3. #83
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    It's all good info.

    Though I mention the A8 4.2L V8 in example, I also run a 2.7 twin turbo A6 Allroad, and a 2.0 turbo A4.

    I'm a Glutton for punishment, I suppose. ;-)

    The A8 just rolled 230K, I bought it at less than 60K. It owes me nothing, but I have gotten rather attached to the old gal ;-)

  4. #84
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    every time I change the oil on my cars I put 1/2 can of seafoam in the tank (make sure it's between 1/2 full and full) and the other half in the oil. Drive round for a little bit, mostly to make sure the oil is hot but also to give the seafoam time to work, then change the oil and filter. Usually no more than 5 miles or so. Doesn't seem to have done any harm so far!

  5. #85
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    Years ago my boss bought a Corolla. All the kids drove it at one time or another, and nobody every changed the oil. At 7 years old it seized up on the highway. That was before synthetic came into wide use, so the dead dinosaurs were working overtime in that engine.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  6. #86
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    That pic Willy shows speaks volumes --- if the lower end looks that bad you can expect extreme gunk in the head(s) as the temps up there generally run allot hotter due to the exhaust ports and combustion chamber top, don't get me wrong the inside of pistons can catch their share also but heads do the most roasting...

    Yet another reason why I do not like mazda's skyactive engines that run their exhaust plenum throughout the heads for "quicker warm-ups and therefor better efficiency" this is not wise practice in the long haul, exhaust ports should be as short as possible and then get rid of it into a separated semi-isolated header system...

    One of the things im seeing more and more is a strange set of circumstances where people claim they check their oil and it's fine - then drive for awhile and the oil light starts to flicker, they then check their oil and it's low or does not even register on the stick,,, if this ever happens to you it can only mean one thing, the heads gunked and so are it's drainback passages to the oil sump, so you have multiple quarts of oil hanging out in the head instead of the pan...

    this will be very common pretty soon with todays direct injection turbo gassers,,, again taking the displacement to horsepower ratings to a whole new level, tiny little engines with the capability to produce BIG power means cooking the crap out of the oil - and all the people taking shortcuts with oil quality WILL get their asses handed to them no exceptions (esp. in my state)

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    That pic Willy shows speaks volumes --- if the lower end looks that bad you can expect extreme gunk in the head(s) as the temps up there generally run allot hotter due to the exhaust ports and combustion chamber top, don't get me wrong the inside of pistons can catch their share also but heads do the most roasting...

    Yet another reason why I do not like mazda's skyactive engines that run their exhaust plenum throughout the heads for "quicker warm-ups and therefor better efficiency" this is not wise practice in the long haul, exhaust ports should be as short as possible and then get rid of it into a separated semi-isolated header system...

    One of the things im seeing more and more is a strange set of circumstances where people claim they check their oil and it's fine - then drive for awhile and the oil light starts to flicker, they then check their oil and it's low or does not even register on the stick,,, if this ever happens to you it can only mean one thing, the heads gunked and so are it's drainback passages to the oil sump, so you have multiple quarts of oil hanging out in the head instead of the pan...

    this will be very common pretty soon with todays direct injection turbo gassers,,, again taking the displacement to horsepower ratings to a whole new level, tiny little engines with the capability to produce BIG power means cooking the crap out of the oil - and all the people taking shortcuts with oil quality WILL get their asses handed to them no exceptions (esp. in my state)
    Damn!
    Step daughter just bought a new Mazda 2, with our financial assistance...........

  8. #88
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    It's not a death sentence just run good syn. oil and maybe get on a once every three changes safe additive and you should be fine, it's the people who are going to be trying to save 4 or 5 bucks per change that will find out early as to how much of a mistake that was...

  9. #89
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    A lot of the newer engine designs use that same approach, not just Mazda. It's all done in order to heat the cylinder head up faster in order to reduce warmup time so that less time is spent in that pre-warm up gray time when engines emit more pollutants. The faster that head gets hot the cleaner the emissions footprint will be. Same thing with cats all using heated oxygen sensors and being placed as close to the head as packaging will allow. Turbo efficiency also benefits from the extra heat input.
    The additional loads placed on an engine oil in today's engine designs is staggering. An engine oil from the 60's would leave a modern engine in a smoking pile of rubble in short order. The oil still looks the same but the chemistry that makes up modern engine oils is what allows us to get away with all of these newer techniques...well maybe not always.

    This is one one of the main driving factors in the use of synthetic oils as they will have a far greater resistance to high temp oxidation while also possessing far greater film strengths at extreme temps, yet still flow when it's minus 30.


    One of the things im seeing more and more is a strange set of circumstances where people claim they check their oil and it's fine - then drive for awhile and the oil light starts to flicker, they then check their oil and it's low or does not even register on the stick,,, if this ever happens to you it can only mean one thing
    Yup, you need a longer dipstick.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    A lot of the newer engine designs use that same approach, not just Mazda. It's all done in order to heat the cylinder head up faster in order to reduce warmup time so that less time is spent in that pre-warm up gray time when engines emit more pollutants. The faster that head gets hot the cleaner the emissions footprint will be.
    Yeah but like I say it has a huge price and is already creating extreme problems,,, sounds good on paper but there's a phrase "know when to say when" and in fact is all you have to do is imagine that same sled pulling a mountain pass pedal to the metal and all those internal head passages just coking the oil to a crisp,,,
    Same thing with cats all using heated oxygen sensors and being placed as close to the head as packaging will allow.
    really not the same thing - thats a win win not a win -lose
    Turbo efficiency also benefits from the extra heat input.
    Turbo efficiency does indeed benefit but if your heads got a built in header system and then finally gets to the turbo your shooting yourself in the foot... Again - get the heat out as quickly as possible and route it directly to the exhaust turbine in the shortest distance and isolate the head from the incredible heat source instead of having to cool it,,, its funny to me - mazdouche claims the internal header design saves something like 8 lbs of weight --- I wonder if their figuring in all the extra coolant the engine has to hold along with the enlarged radiator and electric fan...
    The additional loads placed on an engine oil in today's engine designs is staggering. An engine oil from the 60's would leave a modern engine in a smoking pile of rubble in short order. The oil still looks the same but the chemistry that makes up modern engine oils is what allows us to get away with all of these newer techniques...well maybe not always.
    absolutely - like castrol says - it's liquid engineering...

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