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Thread: Adjustable / Split Die Question

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarge41 View Post
    I think that hex, non-split dies are really thread chasers, not really dies. Usually intended for mechanics, cleaning up bolts and other already threaded objects. Round dies (split with adjust screw) usually have two dimples, 180 degrees apart for driving.

    Sarge41
    +1.
    I was always under the impression the hex dies were cheap 'n cheerful, as were non split round dies, and the high end HSS brand name stuff were always split circular.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    Yes, you must use an image that is hosted on an internet server, with a non-local URL. The ones on your computer would have a URL (URI) of something like "file:///..." or possibly "localhost://...". If your computer were on a publicly visible network it would have a URL like "http://...".

    For example, I was able to insert the following URI into the address bar of my Firefox browser to get a list of the files in my user folder:

    file:///c:/users/paul

    More information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_URI_scheme

    Back on topic, though, the adjustable dies I have are equipped with a single adjustment screw through the split. I'll take a picture when I get the chance.

    Adjustable die, #10-32. Adjusting screw does not seem to be aligned properly when tightened:


    I have these five: #8-36, #8-32, #10-32, #10-24, and 1/4"-20:


    Here is a round 3/8"-16 die in a hex die holder. I'm not sure where my other die holders are.
    I'm not sure about all this "file:///..." or possibly "localhost://...". If your computer were on a publicly visible network it would have a URL like "http://...". stuff. I haven't given it any attention when I tried to drag and drop photo.
    I will the next time though.

    On the split die..... I have seen the ones where the set screw screws in between the split. Must be the threaded split hole was tapered / partially threaded. Just another version of something that does the same thing.

    JL............

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarge41 View Post
    I think that hex, non-split dies are really thread chasers, not really dies. Usually intended for mechanics, cleaning up bolts and other already threaded objects. Round dies (split with adjust screw) usually have two dimples, 180 degrees apart for driving.

    Sarge41
    I never knew that way back when I got my first Ace Hanson tap and die sets, both standard and metric. I have heard it from a few people since then.
    I did a lot of threading and tapping with them.

    JL.................

  4. #24
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    One useful thing you can do with the split dies which have four holes is crack a spare one in half. it can then be fitted on the good threads of a damaged bolt and run off, in the die stock to recut the damaged end. Without the danger of crossthreading.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaiguzzi View Post
    +1.
    I was always under the impression the hex dies were cheap 'n cheerful, as were non split round dies, and the high end HSS brand name stuff were always split circular.
    Round split dies may be adjusted for correct PD, a threading die held in the same holder, used in the same machine during the same day will often yield different PD's on different materials.
    For instance a 1"-16 TPI die may produce an acceptable thread on an aluminum part one minute then an unacceptable thread on a 316 SS part the very next minute, this will require an adjustment of the die.

    Many believe that a new die from the manufacturer will produce an acceptable thread in every material and set up, but it does not work that way unfortunately. Actually measuring a thread is something that many hobbyists can not do or will not do. It is tedious and annoying at best (-:

  6. #26
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    Measuring a thread produced by a die seems like a joke to me, they are rarely good enough.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaiguzzi View Post
    +1.
    I was always under the impression the hex dies were cheap 'n cheerful, as were non split round dies, and the high end HSS brand name stuff were always split circular.
    I have probably mentioned this before but split dies are mostly British/American thing. German and most of the continental europe made dies are non-adjustable irregardless of quality or material.

    https://www.hahn-kolb.de/Main-Catalo...22AT_DIN%22%5D

    https://www.vanommen.nl/en-us/thread...metric-coarse/

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bented View Post
    Round split dies may be adjusted for correct PD, a threading die held in the same holder, used in the same machine during the same day will often yield different PD's on different materials.
    For instance a 1"-16 TPI die may produce an acceptable thread on an aluminum part one minute then an unacceptable thread on a 316 SS part the very next minute, this will require an adjustment of the die.

    Many believe that a new die from the manufacturer will produce an acceptable thread in every material and set up, but it does not work that way unfortunately. Actually measuring a thread is something that many hobbyists can not do or will not do. It is tedious and annoying at best (-:
    I have a Starrett thread pitch mic that makes all that much easier. I rarely use it when threading with a die, especially if a class 3 or what ever the standard is for an off the shelf nut and bolt is all you need.
    I've used it for precision threading on the lathe where I have more control over it.
    As far as my U-bots go, as long as the nuts threads on with a little play it's fine.
    So far the ones I've cut with the split die ended up being .311 on the OD. A little on the big side.

    I did try to reduce the OD down to about .309 but for some reason I can't get a smaller OD. I think the issue is that the conical set screw which is now doing all the holding opens the die up when force from threading is exerted on it.

    JL............

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